8 December

Where’s Your Photography Honeypot?

Darwin and I have a secret photo place we go to. It’s close by, it’s easy to access and it almost always delivers something. Here are some images from an outing to the  historic Cochrane Ranche site made last spring.

©Samantha Chrysanthou

©Samantha Chrysanthou

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

©Samantha Chrysanthou

©Samantha Chrysanthou

©Samantha Chrysanthou

©Samantha Chrysanthou

©Samantha Chrysanthou

©Samantha Chrysanthou

We only spent just over an hour, but had a much higher ‘keeper rate’ than usual from a photo outing. Normally, we delete around 90% of the images from a photo shoot. (Yes, DELETE, as in permanently toss. Hey, junk is junk! By now we usually appreciate the difference between a good image and a mediocre one – and we still have those “what was I thinking?” stinkers that also end up in the digital trash can.) But our keeper rate from this last spring visit was over 80%! This makes us very happy. Here’s the breakdown:

Darwin: 46 exposures, 16 unique compositions, 13 keepers

Sam: 42 exposures, 18 unique compositions, 15 keepers (ahem, note my slight edge in quantity if not quality…)

©Samantha Chrysanthou

©Samantha Chrysanthou

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

©Samantha Chrysanthou

©Samantha Chrysanthou

©Samantha Chrysanthou

©Samantha Chrysanthou

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

Notice also that, even though we are sometimes standing shoulder-to-shoulder, we still come away with our own unique style with the same subject matter (Darwin always warms things up!) Good honeypots offer a variety of ways to interpret a place for the creative shooter.

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

©Samantha Chrysanthou

©Samantha Chrysanthou

©Samantha Chrysanthou

©Samantha Chrysanthou

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

Do you have a local photo honeypot? Where do you head when you have limited time but are hoping for good returns?

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

©Samantha Chrysanthou

©Samantha Chrysanthou

©Samantha Chrysanthou

©Samantha Chrysanthou

©Samantha Chrysanthou

©Samantha Chrysanthou

Save

30 November

The Urban Tiny House

Here at oopoomoo we are interested in people who have carved their dreams out of the impenetrable bedrock of societal structure. One local person who has done just that and who is a huge inspiration to us is Jackie Skrypnek. For years Jackie has quietly volunteered behind the scenes in the local food, environment and social sustainability movements. Jackie puts in the work because she believes a better world is possible. She is not looking for accolades or awards; she is looking for results.

nmp17521

Jackie, Samantha and I all have Permaculture Design Certificates (PDCs) from Verge Permaculture in Calgary. Part of the mandate or being a “permie” is to take action and do something that makes a difference in the world. Jackie has done just that. She has transformed her backyard from lawn into an ecologically sustainable food production centre which provides fresh, organic food for her family and friends. And she and her husband, Bryan, have built a passive solar tiny home in their backyard that will operate as an educational B+B teaching people about passive solar design, smaller footprint living and permaculture gardening principles.

nmp17509

The tiny home is only 247 sq feet but packs in sleeping, bathroom, kitchen, living, and dining areas. Jackie designed the tiny home and Jackie and Bryan built it themselves — it’s a work of art! Jackie battled the town bureaucracy to make the first tiny home B+B in Cochrane happen and now, through her perseverance, Jackie’s dream is ready to share with the world. On December 4, from 1 – 3 PM, Jackie is having an open house in Cochrane so you can see the tiny home for yourself and maybe even win a one night stay (there is a draw!). For details on the open house just download this PDF. If you can’t come, we’ve taken a few photos to show you this amazing little tiny home. Congratulations Jackie and Bryan! Cochrane is proud of you!

The Hereabouts Tiny Home website is now live for bookings!

nmp17508

nmp17507

nmp17492

nmp17512

nmp17493-copy

nmp17514

nmp17511

nmp17510

nmp17495

 

 

6 November

The oopoomoo Pokie Awards!

Anyone who has been to oopoomoo seminars or workshops will be familiar with one of the most common compositional flaws in photography – the dreaded pokie.

What is a pokie? No, it’s not a friend of Gumby but rather it’s:

Little objects that stick into the edge of your frame accidentally.

Pokies are not purposeful parts of the composition. Instead they sneak into the frame like unwelcome guests and ruin the party by drawing attention to themselves. In short, they weaken your images. In the image below, can you spot the pokie?

©Samantha Chrysanthou

©Samantha Chrysanthou

Pretty obvious, eh? That little spruce branch in the upper right corner of the frame just screams out, “Look at me!”

Sometimes we are so fixated on our subjects while shooting that we don’t notice pokies until later when we look at the images on the computer screen. But once you are aware of pokies you’ll start to notice them all the time and you’ll learn to adjust your composition right away to get rid of those pesky buggers.

©Darwin Wiggett - The little bush in the lower left corner of the frame is a sneaky little pokie.

©Darwin Wiggett – The little bush in the lower left corner of the frame is sneaking into the composition!

©Darwin Wiggett - A Slight shift in position gives a pokie free composition!

©Darwin Wiggett – A slight shift in position kills that annoying pokie! Much better.

In some cases you can clone or crop out the offending pokies but sometimes you can’t. Rather than fix compositional errors in post, you’ll be a better photographer and you’ll save time at the computer later if you learn to spot and eliminate pokies in the field.

©Darwin Wiggett - A definite pokie problem here!

©Darwin Wiggett – A definite pokie problem here!

©Darwin Wiggett - A definite pokie problem here.

©Darwin Wiggett – Ah, pokie free and happy!

The Contest

Show us your best pokie shot and win a spot in one of our January 2017 Resolve: Discover Your Creative Self eCourses. Post your image or images to our oopoomoo Facebook group or email us your entry (info at oopoomoo.com) before midnight MDT November 16, 2017. Below are some ideas of the kinds of images to enter.

  • The Annoying Pokie – Show us a great shot that you made that was ruined or marred by an uninvited pokie.
  • The Pokie Eliminator – Show us how you zapped away a pokie by changing your composition while shooting (we’ll need to see a before picture showing the nasty pokie, and then the fixed, pokie-free photo). No Photoshop fixes please!
  • A Famous Pokie – Show us an annoying pokie in an iconic photograph from a famous photographer (yes, pokies have learned how to be published!). Be sure to credit the photographer and provide a website link to where you found the photo (comment and criticism on published pieces are allowed as fair use). Note: we can only award the pokie prize to a photographer who submits their original work so this last category is more for fun, education and discussion than for prize consideration.

Be sure to tag your images with #thepokieawards to ensure we consider your entry.

©Darwin Wiggett - A popular and widely published image with several pokie problems!

©Darwin Wiggett – A popular and widely published image of mine with several pokie problems!

7 October

Our Obsession with Gear

This article was previously published in Outdoor Photography Canada several years ago. To get these articles when they first come out please subscribe  to the magazine. 😉

We’ve all heard the old saying: “It’s not the camera that makes the picture, it’s the photographer.” Why in music isn’t there a similar refrain? “It’s not the piano that makes the music, it’s the musician.” Or in art? “It’s not the brush or the paint, but the painter.”  We rarely care about what brand of brush an artist uses; we care about the art produced. So why is it that, invariably, the first question asked of photographers is, “what kind of camera do you use?”

Photographer with King Penguin at Fortuna Bay, South Georgia Island ©Darwin Wiggett - oopoomoo.com

Photographer with King Penguin at Fortuna Bay, South Georgia Island
©Darwin Wiggett

We think the problem with photography is that photographers use a tool that records images directly from reality.  There is no implied ‘interpretation’ in using a camera. It’s seen as a device which objectively records the ‘real’ world. As such, we think that the better the recording device (the camera), the more accurate the reality, and therefore the better the photograph. And so it goes. As photographers we become obsessed with getting better and better gear. Our camera, lenses and accessories become the ends to the means and the means to an end. We become slaves and lovers of the technical aspects of the endeavour. Art is forgotten if even acknowledged at all.

©Samantha Chysanthou - oopoomoo.com

©Samantha Chysanthou

In photography we are less likely to think like an artist. An artist uses his or her tools as a means of inner expression. Art is about telling the world who you are and what you think. Art is not reality; it’s an interpretation of your personal reality. Photographers mistakenly believe that the more they know about gear, tools and technique, the more accurate their representation of reality. Of course, nothing is further from the truth. Obsession with gear and goodies only gets in the way of communicating any message whether that message is journalistic or artistic. In photography we spend precious little time developing vision and voice. Mostly we just want to play with goodies.

sam5871

Aspen Trees and Abraham Lake – ©Samantha Chrysanthou

For photographers who want to advance beyond gear obsession into the realm of artistic expression, we recommend several approaches:

  1. Take a bare minimum of gear with you on photo outings. We have written about this before but remind you about taking only a camera and one prime lens like a 50mm lens to help you hone your ability to see and express yourself with a single tool.
  2. Think of your photography not as a hunt for single trophy shots but instead in terms of a project. Pick a topic (e.g. garbage, trees, puddles) or a conceptual theme (isolation, power, contrast) and develop a body of work that speaks to the topic or theme. Project-based photography will help you concentrate more on the message than the medium. Gear quickly becomes secondary and diminished in importance compared to artistic expression.
  3. Take a course in photography that is about leaning to see and expression. Avoid courses that discuss technique or gear. You want to exercise your creative expression and not your wallet. Buying more gear, software or camera goodies will not help you. Invest in discovering your creative eye. One option is our Resolve: Discover Your Creative Self  eCourse which is targeted so that you discover what makes your creative clock tick.
  4. Instead of reading on-line reviews of cameras and lenses, book off a day a month to go to art galleries and check out paintings, sculptures and visual installations. Take a notepad and jot down why the art appeals to you or not. Relax and really look at the pieces. What is the art telling you about the artist?
  5. Don’t try too hard; let your subjects speak to you. Don’t force a technique or a conscious attempt at style. Just respond and soon your photos will be created from within and not as a result of blindly jabbing at the shutter of your high-priced optical recording device.
  6. Get off the camera control crutch. Go back to fully auto or program mode in your camera and just shoot intuitively. Don’t think, just respond.

Of course there is a lot more you can do, but hopefully these little exercises will get you off the obsession with gear and on to the discovery of your self!

Ripples on Horseshoe Lake, Jasper National Park, Alberta, Canada ©Darwin Wiggett - oopoomoo.com

Ripples on Horseshoe Lake, Jasper National Park
©Darwin Wiggett

28 September

Student Project Mentorship – George Clayton Tells a Rural Story

Out of all our students who took the 7/365: The Mentored Photo Project this summer, George Clayton is the one who appeared determined to torture himself the most. Not only did he choose a topic that was challenging in interpretation, it also came along with obstacles of access! Luckily, George demonstrated a fabulous “can do” attitude, a skill that will serve him well in all his endeavours. Here’s George’s project statement:

My project is about advancing the positive public perception of Canadian agriculture and the men and women who shape the landscape one casually sees driving on any prairie highway.  These images will hopefully reflect the care and stewardship they passionately practice year after year to produce healthy food for millions at home and abroad.

George’s passion for telling the story of farmers and agricultural families is palpable. We were fortunate enough to meet George over coffee after his project was complete and discuss in more detail the importance of creativity, daily practice and the pursuit of excellence. George will continue to work on his project over time as this is a topic near and dear to his heart and is fueled by his past work in the agricultural industry. So without further ado, here is a collection of George’s images representing the care and stewardship rural folk have for their lands.

©George Clayton

©George Clayton

©George Clayton

©George Clayton

©George Clayton

©George Clayton

©George Clayton

©George Clayton

©George Clayton

©George Clayton

©George Clayton

©George Clayton

©George Clayton

©George Clayton

©George Clayton

©George Clayton

©George Clayton

©George Clayton

©George Clayton

©George Clayton

We’ll give George the final word:

The images may not show what was to be captured with a lens during this week.  But the lessons, the encouragement and the place You, Sam and Darwin took me will not be lost.  I can take that year, that summer and try to capture something that could be, for me, easy to avoid.  I ask for the challenge and have accepted it.  There is more work to do.

14 September

Student Project Mentorship – Life is a Highway with Chris Bone

Highway 762 is different things to different people; just another road on their way to somewhere else, a destination for cyclists and motorcyclists, a place to drive slowly while viewing the scenery, the route for an annual cattle drive; and probably more besides. I intend to peel back my familiarity with the subject in an attempt to reveal what I see as the essence of this short, 22 km highway.

Meet Chris Bone. Chris is someone who travels Highway 762 a lot – whenever he wants to get anywhere from his home, in fact. While there may be more iconic stretches of pavement in the world, 762 has its own particular charm. But if you are setting a mentored project for yourself, and you want to push yourself to see something… deeper than scenery, more unexpected than cliché, is a road a good subject matter to choose?

It’s certainly not an easy choice! That’s Chris’ project statement above, and his portfolio of ten images below. In some ways, Chris was easy to mentor: he needed little guidance on goal-setting, articulating his idea or curating a final collection. We think he has come up with a very thoughtful story about Highway 762 as portrayed in his photo essay below. We suspect Chris will continue to travel everyday roads and come away with something unique to say about the experience.

©Chris Bone

©Chris Bone

©Chris Bone

©Chris Bone

©Chris Bone

©Chris Bone

©Chris Bone

©Chris Bone

©Chris Bone

©Chris Bone

©Chris Bone

©Chris Bone

©Chris Bone

©Chris Bone

©Chris Bone

©Chris Bone

©Chris Bone

©Chris Bone

©Chris Bone

©Chris Bone

For previous students’ mentored projects, click here.

1 September

Student Project Mentorship – Barb Kreutter

I’m not going to say much about Barb’s results from the 7/365: The Mentored Photo Project. There’s not much to say…because they’re excellent! Fresh seeing, working with everyday objects, many shot in bright daylight…how many of us can come away with such a strong, compelling portfolio? And Barb was quite prolific (you can see more results at her website), generating several other themes than the one represented in these ten images. Her keeper rate was astounding, so we found the best way to help Barb going forward was an exercise in curating her collection. Congratulations, Barb, for an incredible body of work!

Barb’s project statement:

Through the use of composition and pattern, I will uncover the extraordinary in the everyday world around me.

©Barb Kreutter

©Barb Kreutter

©Barb Kreutter

©Barb Kreutter

©Barb Kreutter

©Barb Kreutter

©Barb Kreutter

©Barb Kreutter

©Barb Kreutter

©Barb Kreutter

©Barb Kreutter

©Barb Kreutter

©Barb Kreutter

©Barb Kreutter

©Barb Kreutter

©Barb Kreutter

©Barb Kreutter

©Barb Kreutter

©Barb Kreutter

©Barb Kreutter

 

24 August

Iceland, Abbotsford and Beyond!

Here at oopoomoo HQ we are getting set for a busy season of teaching, talking and taking (photos of course).

First up, we are thrilled to be part of a photo print exhibition on September 8 at Resolve Photo in Calgary. The print show is called RAÐLJÓST and the show features the work of fifteen local photographers who’ve traveled to — and fallen in love with — Iceland. Inspired by the Icelandic word “raðljóst” (which translates to “enough light to navigate”) the photographs seek to show Iceland interpreted creatively by each artist. Sam and I got a sneak peak at some of the prints going into the show and we are thrilled to report that you’ll discover an Iceland unlike anything you’ve seen before. And seeing these finely crafted prints in person reminds us that a key aspect of photography is not only posting photos to the web but also the tangible pleasure of viewing them as works of art in the form of prints. Some may even argue that the pinnacle in photography is a finely created print! Rather than show off the works here on the website we encourage you to come in person and enjoy the surprising views and luscious nature of fine art photographic prints of Iceland. For more information please check out this link.

©Darwin Wiggett - Mývatn Lake, Iceland

©Darwin Wiggett – Mývatn Lake, Iceland

Second, speaking of creative vision and personal expression, we want to remind you that oopoomoo will be in Abbotsford BC on October 22 to present our new show, “The Visionary Photographer”. In this show we’ll cover topics designed to take you into the realm of photographic artistry:

  • The Confident Artist and The Art of Visual Perception
  • Creative Lens Choice and Camera Controls for Visionary Photographers
  • Advanced Compositional Patterns for the Visionary Photographer
  • Personal Style and Creative Vision: The Metamorphosis of an Artist

Early bird pricing on this show ends August 31, so be sure to register soon if you plan to go. Plus we’d love to reconnect and meet BC friends old and new.

Whaling Station Remains, Whaler's Bay, Antarctica ©Darwin Wiggett - oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett

And finally, you may have noticed the fine work coming from students completing our 7/365 – The Mentored Photo Project eCourse. We are thrilled with the inspiring work of our students and have shared their July results. Watch for more awesome projects from our August students coming soon to the blog! If you have a photo project in you bursting to be seen, we have four private mentorships available this September.

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

18 August

Project Mentorship: The Bragging Wall Part III

We love it when photographers get creative.

©Pam Jenks

©Pam Jenks

We also love making mentorships a weeny-teeny bit challenging for our students. Pam Jenks confessed at the outset of this mentorship that she loves “big, spectacular landscapes” but when in the field struggles a bit to see compelling leading lines or interesting foregrounds. Her initial idea involved layers. We liked that concept, but wanted to make things a bit more interesting…Pam’s job was not to photograph just simple layers, but to make an image where layers were paramount and the first impression…overlaid upon what on second look is straightforward, raw nature. No post-processing props, no glory light or dazzling colour (ok, a little colour)…Pam’s images required careful, objective seeing in the field and strong composition work.

Here is Pam’s project statement:

I want to create a collection of images where the viewer first notices layers (lines/rectangles) and then secondly sees what was used to create those layers.  I’ll do this by creating abstract images; the realism of the landscape or natural scene will be hidden in those layers. 

Ten of her images are below. We think she did very well, don’t you?

©Pam Jenks

©Pam Jenks

©Pam Jenks

©Pam Jenks

©Pam Jenks

©Pam Jenks

©Pam Jenks

©Pam Jenks

©Pam Jenks

©Pam Jenks

©Pam Jenks

©Pam Jenks

©Pam Jenks

©Pam Jenks

©Pam Jenks

©Pam Jenks

©Pam Jenks

©Pam Jenks

In fact, we think more photographers should delve as deeply into their subject matter as Pam did in this mentorship – Shrek and Donkey think so too – because everybody loves parfaits!

From the movie, Shrek:
Shrek: For your information, there’s a lot more to ogres than people think.
Donkey: Example?
Shrek: Example… uh… ogres are like onions!
[holds up an onion, which Donkey sniffs]
Donkey: They stink?
Shrek: Yes… No!
Donkey: Oh, they make you cry?
Shrek: No!
Donkey: Oh, you leave ’em out in the sun, they get all brown, start sproutin’ little white hairs…
Shrek: [peels an onion] NO! Layers. Onions have layers. Ogres have layers… You get it? We both have layers.
[walks off]
Donkey: Oh, you both have LAYERS. Oh. You know, not everybody like onions. CAKE! Everybody loves cake! Cakes have layers!
Shrek: I don’t care what everyone likes! Ogres are not like cakes.
Donkey: You know what ELSE everybody likes? Parfaits! Have you ever met a person, you say, “Let’s get some parfait,” they say, “Hell no, I don’t like no parfait.”? Parfaits are delicious!
Shrek: NO! You dense, irritating, miniature beast of burden! Ogres are like onions! End of story! Bye-bye! See ya later.
Donkey: Parfait’s gotta be the most delicious thing on the whole damn planet!

(Source: http://www.imdb.com/character/ch0002002/quotes)

Check out previous students Lynn and Erin’s projects for the 7/365: The Mentored Photo Project course too!

8 August

Project Mentorship: Bragging Wall Part II

Last week we posted Lynn Schwehr’s project about ‘seeing’ the incredible diversity and beauty of flowers. Today we want to share Erin La Place’s project from the 7/365: The Mentored Photo Project eCourse. We are excited to introduce Erin’s work in part because she engages with subject matter close to our own hearts – the prairie.

©Erin LaPlace

©Erin LaPlace

Erin works at a fulfilling but demanding job in health care in a busy city. Calling herself a prairie girl at heart, Erin heads out, camera in hand, to Alberta’s backroads and secondary highways whenever the strains of work pile up. We guided Erin to take on a challenging project theme: develop a visual narrative that brings the viewer along on her journey from stressed to discovery, healing and transformation. Here is how Erin described her project:

My project is about how I, this big city girl, when overwhelmed by the stressors of life, retreat to the Prairies to calm my senses and soothe my soul. This series of images will reflect my personal journey towards peace and healing, as I travel the roads less traveled in South and Central Alberta.

It was a pleasure to review Erin’s images which were all well-composed. Not a pokie, merger or black hole in sight! Because of Erin’s superior composition skills, she was able to successfully tackle an advanced project theme that was refreshingly original and unique. It takes bravery to put deeply personal work out there, and we salute Erin for doing so. So, here is a tightly curated series illustrating Erin’s journey. A stressed out city girl finds comfort, peace and discovery through visual meditation on the prairies, allowing her to return home transformed and healed.

©Erin LaPlace

©Erin LaPlace

©Erin LaPlace

©Erin LaPlace

©Erin LaPlace

©Erin LaPlace

©Erin LaPlace

©Erin LaPlace

©Erin LaPlace

©Erin LaPlace

©Erin LaPlace

©Erin LaPlace

©Erin LaPlace

©Erin LaPlace

©Erin LaPlace

©Erin LaPlace

©Erin LaPlace

©Erin LaPlace

©Erin LaPlace

©Erin LaPlace

Top