22 February

Creative Pet and Dog Photography Workshops

We’re excited to announce two new photo workshops for pet lovers! Held at the Cochrane and Area Humane Society, there will be live demos in one and a chance for participants to photograph the animals in the other. Anytime we include animals in a live show there are sure to be hijinks so that’s worth the price of admission alone!¬† ūüėČ

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Come learn some new skills, have a few laughs and polish up your pet photography skills. Check out our two new offerings below.

Better Pet Photography Made Easy!

In this workshop we’ll teach you simple tips and tricks to make your family pet images creative, fun and engaging. If you wish you had the knowledge needed to make better pet photos we have the easy and effective answers! This is not a photo course full of jargon and tech talk but one that focuses on getting awesome results whether you use a smart phone, a point-n-shoot or a dSLR camera. You already have a bond and know your pet better than anyone; the only ingredient missing is some easy-to-learn photography basics to make your images soar. Come and join us on March 5, 2017 at the Cochrane and Area Humane Society for this two-hour fun-filled romp through the exciting adventure of pet photography (complete with live demos). To learn more or to register go here.

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Sit, Stay and Smile: Creative Dog Photography with your dSLR

This hands-on course is for anyone with a dSLR who is interested in making compelling and creative images of dogs using existing light. The magic in great images of dogs occur at the intersection of dog behaviour and the creative use of camera controls. In this four-hour course, we’ll explain in easy-to-understand terms which camera controls create story-telling images and how to make photography a fun game for your pooch. After the 1.5-hour classroom session (with live demos!) students will spend¬† 1.5-hours photographing dogs, on site, at the Cochrane and Area Humane Society. The resulting photos will be discussed in a one-hour critique session so students get immediate feedback on how to improve. To learn more or register go here.

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To whet your appetite for the kinds of tips and techniques we’ll be talking about in the Creative Dog Photography workshop check out our Shooting Blind for Better Action Portraits of Dogs article or look at some of our favourite dog photos.

Shyme - ©Darwin Wiggett - oopoomoo.com

 

10 June

Fabulous Film Fridays Walkabout – June 17, 2016

Free Fabulous Film Friday Walkabout!

Calling all analogue die-hards and film-curious photogs! We are hosting a free walk in Cochrane, Alberta – all you need is a film camera (any type, any format). Actually, you don’t even need that as we’ll have some filmy stuff on hand for you to play with in case you don’t own a film camera. And we might even have a roll or two of 35mm film we can spare as well.

Who: all levels (max. 12 people. Email info@oopoomoo.com to register)
What: a two-hour meander with friends and a chance to shoot some film and feel retro (bell-bottoms optional)
When: June 17, 7 to 9pm – on a Friday of course!
Where: Mitford Park in Cochrane, Alberta (meet in the parking lot by the stage)
After the walk, we are heading over for refreshments at a new espresso and wine bar in Cochrane called The Gentry. Join us for a snack and chance to shoot the breeze with colleagues on all things film, photography and fun.

Can’t make it out? Organize your own Film Friday Walkabout in your local area. Make sure you show and share your images Fridays in the oopoomoo Creatives Facebook group (hashtag #fabulousfilmfridays).

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8 December

NEW! – Resolve Photography eCourse

We’re excited to announce a new course on oopoomoo! Resolve: Discover Your Creative Self is a self-directed eCourse all about YOU!

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

There are plenty of ‘how to’ courses in photography – heck, we’ve taught our fair share of ’em! – but what seems to be missing is a backgrounder course that explores your inspirations and motivations behind pressing the shutter. What are your photographic strengths and weaknesses? What are you most terrified of photographing? What new heights could you reach artistically if you were able to peek under the hood and understand the why of photography for you?

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

By parts fun-silly and brutally direct, the Resolve Photography eCourse is a little like a self-help course complete with its own straitjacket. There’s no empty fluff here! Expect to dig deeper with daily challenging assignments designed to peel back the comfortable complacency we often settle into as artists. It’s like that paternalistic Polonius guy said to Laertes, “to thine own self be true” because then you can’t be false to any man – or your photographs! Something like that.

So is 2016 the year you invest in your photography? Then it’s essential you start off on the right foot by understanding who YOU are as a photographer and the talent that underlies your images.

Photographer, Kootenay Plains, Alberta, Canada

What will you find? ©Samantha Chrysanthou

Intrigued? Are you ready to soar creatively? Then check out our Resolve: Discover Your Creative Self eCourse. Our first session sold out in three days. We are offering a second session this January but again with limit spaces.

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

10 November

Honouring Your Creative Vision

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

Samantha and I have written extensively on the oopoomoo blog about honouring your creative vision. To be an artist you need to follow your muse especially when outside forces always seem to want to sabotage your progress. For example, my output in photography was directed for years by the need to produce saleable images for stock photography. I shot things I normally would not be interested in and I learned how to make images which would please photo buyers. Once stock photography started to dry up (post 9-11), then money was to be made in providing tours and workshops to other photographers. The imagery I created was meant to entice participants to sign up for desirable destinations or to learn technique driven processes. My own development as an artist suffered. And so the time has come to allow my creative vision free reign of expression.

©Samantha Chrysanthou

©Samantha Chrysanthou

Samantha and I have taken the pressure off ourselves to produce work for others. We are not shooting for stock nor are we shooting to gather potential tour or workshop clients. Sam never really pursued these things anyway.¬†Instead, we’re returning to photography purely as a creative outlet. Of course, giving up our successful and acclaimed workshop program means we have cut our income by about 1/3rd. But that is a small price to pay to go on a path of self-discovery. To finance our journey we have cut expenses and gotten part time jobs outside the world of photography. Our jobs are what we do to support ourselves as artists. We have decided to purposefully walk the pathway of creativity and see where it takes us. For too long we have been teaching others to do this but we haven‚Äôt done it ourselves. You‚Äôll see oopoomoo stay true to its roots of create, inspire and educate through us sharing both our journey and, increasingly, the journeys of others ‚Äď in fact, we make this adjustment in order to focus more clearly on this important aspect of photo sharing and story-telling. We have a great desire to help photographers be artists. And we welcome all creatives to share their discoveries and stories here on the oopomoo blog or in our oopoomoo Facebook group. Stay tuned!

To read part II of this post, Carving Out Time for Creativity, please go to this link.

©Samantha Chrysanthou

©Samantha Chrysanthou

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

15 October

Light Painting for Beginners – No Calculations Required!

In advance of our Scaretography: Halloween Light Painting Event on October 25, we thought we’d have a little tutorial on light painting so that you can try some spooky effects on your own at any time. We’ll be doing more fun things with flash at Scaretography than just light painting, but this should get you started!

What is Light Painting?

Light painting is a photographic technique in which pictures are made by moving a hand-held light source onto a subject while taking a long exposure photograph. The results are unpredictable and different each and every time which adds to the joy of discovery! I use a few simple steps to set up for light painting.

©Samantha Chrysanthou - Here I used a flashlight to skim over the Limber Pine during this 25 second exposure at dusk.

©Samantha Chrysanthou РHere I used a flashlight to skim over the limber pine during this 25 second exposure at dusk.

Back in the good ‚Äėole film days, getting around the reciprocity problem (the degradation of the film‚Äôs sensitivity with loss of light during exposure) required more advanced knowledge of exposure calculation. With today‚Äôs digital cameras, you can ‚Äúguesstimate‚ÄĚ your exposure and adjust as needed without having to expertly calculate exposure. Although knowing more about exposure will always make you a better photographer, here is your cheat sheet for easy light painting.

©Darwin Wiggett - Back in the film days you often had to double or triple the normal exposure time required when you had exposure longer than 30 seconds. This is a four-minute exposure at dusk with Velvia 50 slide film.

©Darwin Wiggett РBack in the film days you often had to double or triple the normal exposure time required when you had an exposure longer than 30 seconds. This is a four-minute exposure at dusk with Velvia 50 slide film.

There are only a few simple steps I follow to set up for light painting. First, determine an appropriate subject. You will have to visualize how it will look lit up at dusk. It’s often best to select a single, prominent subject with a clean background. The point is to highlight the lit subject, not to capture a full landscape! Old vehicles in a grassy field, a lone skeletal tree, or a small barn work well for light painting. Often, I will only subtly paint the subject or select certain parts of the image (old tail lights on vehicles work well for this) to bring to life with the flashlight.

©Samantha Chrysanthou - A skim of light over the grass and truck and a directed beam of light on the head lights of the truck make this old truck come alive in the dusk light.

©Samantha Chrysanthou РA skim of light over the grass and truck and a directed beam of light on the head lights of the truck make this old truck come alive in the dusk light.

Second, buy appropriate flashlights. You will need at least one, and often two is better. Click the flashlight on and evaluate the type of light it provides. Is it a hot, small white light from a compact handheld? Or is it a yellow, larger, less focused light from a big tungsten flashlight? I like to shoot with warmer hued lights with one-million candle power or more. With newer LED lights take a yellow or orange gel and tape it over the light to give a warm glow against the cobalt blue dusk. Having your white balance set to ‘daylight’ or ‘sunny’ will also return a pleasing warm/cool contrast. Ensure that your flashlights are fully charged! (Everyone makes this mistake at least once.)

©Samantha Chrysanthou - You need lots of battery power to light bigger subjects!

©Samantha Chrysanthou РYou need lots of battery power to light bigger subjects!

Third, head out to your subject in the evening before it becomes dusk. You want plenty of light so that you can walk around your subject and determine the most interesting composition. Usually, depending on how early you start and on how light the sky stays during the shoot, only one or two compositions will be taken. It is very difficult to compose and focus as it gets darker, so determine the best composition and set up your camera before it’s dusk. Once focus is achieved, switch to manual focus so your camera will not hunt to focus in the dark. Use a polarizer to help darken the sky. A polarizer will also allow you to start shooting a bit earlier as they remove one to two stops of light. Your camera must be on a tripod for such long exposures, and using a cable release will help prevent any camera movement. If you want to blend parts of several exposures of the light painted image into a final image, then don’t move the camera or tripod during the session!

©Darwin Wiggett - Tungsten flashlights (or gelled LED lights) give a warm subject glow against a dusky blue background.

©Darwin Wiggett РTungsten flashlights (or gelled LED lights) give a warm subject against a dusky blue background.

How do you know when to start taking pictures? Ideally, you will want to take pictures when the ambient light is the same intensity as the sky. But what does this look like? First, determine which direction you are shooting. If your camera is pointing away from the sunset, you may notice that the sky in that direction is darker than the sky just above where the sun went down. This means that you will be able to start shooting sooner if your camera is pointing in that direction than if your camera was pointing toward the sunset. If you have no sky in your picture, then you will need to evaluate the ambient light compared to the sky in general. One trick is to look at your subject and squint your eyes a bit. If the light on your subject seems as bright as the sky, then it’s time to take your first exposure. If the light around your subject still seems a bit brighter than your subject, it may still be too early for a light painting.

©Darwin Wiggett - We like to shoot when the light on the subject is just a bit brighter than the surrounding light.

©Darwin Wiggett РWe like the results best when the light on the subject is just a bit brighter than the surrounding light.

When the ambient light and the sky seem about equal in intensity, set your camera to bulb function so that you can have exposures longer than 30 seconds (the longest the shutter will stay open on a camera on shutter or aperture priority setting). Leave your aperture at f16 or f11 to start, although you may have to select a wider aperture like f8 later as it gets darker. Take an exposure at 30 seconds, and press playback to check your histogram (if you don‚Äôt know how to view the histogram of the image, refer to your camera‚Äôs manual). A histogram is a graph that shows the tonal values of a photograph. Knowing how to read the histogram is the most important part of light painting! You want the image to be properly exposed so that you have enough data when you process the image to avoid noise that results from an underexposed file. A ‚Äėgood‚Äô histogram should have most of the data in the centre or centre-right of the graph without any data jamming up against either end of the graph. This is because digital cameras record more information in the brighter tones of the spectrum (represented by the right hand side of the graph) and record less data in dark tones. If your histogram shows data jammed at one or both ends, then data is being lost through clipping: the tonal range of the exposure is too great for the camera to record. If all the data is in the graph, but appears to be concentrated on the left side of the graph, the image is likely slightly underexposed. The actual shape of the graphed data does not matter for our purposes, and it also does not matter if data spikes through the top of the histogram.

©Samantha Chrysanthou - Be sure to judge your exposures based on the histogram and not how good the image looks on your LCD. In the dark, underexposed images look really bright on the LCD!

©Samantha Chrysanthou РBe sure to judge your exposures based on the histogram and not how good the image looks on your LCD. In the dark, underexposed images look really bright on the LCD!

The biggest mistake most photographers make when light painting is to take the image, look at the back of their LCD and determine that the exposure is fine because the LCD display looks good. But don‚Äôt be fooled! The display you are seeing is not the actual photograph you just took; it’s your camera‚Äôs best guess, represented in a small jpeg image, of what your final image will look like. This is why it’s critical to look at the histogram to determine if you have not underexposed your dusk image. On the LCD, the image may look too bright, but ignore this. When you process the image, it will come out looking as your eye saw it at the time.

©Samantha Chrysanthou - You can always darken a slightly bright picture to make it look more dark but making a dark image brighter will cause increased noise and degradation of image quality.

©Samantha Chrysanthou РYou can always darken a slightly bright picture to make it look more dark but making a dark image brighter will cause increased noise and degradation of image quality.

If at 30 seconds, the data is jammed to the right on the histogram, wait until it gets darker and take another test shot. If the data is contained within the histogram and centre or centre-right, then you are ready to start light painting. Take another exposure of 30 seconds but this time aim your flashlight on your subject. You will want to pass the beam of the flashlight in an even manner over the areas you wish lit up in the 30 second time frame. (If 30 seconds is not enough time for you to pass the flashlight over the areas you wish to cover, wait until it gets darker for a longer exposure time). To avoid hot spots where the flashlight was held too long in one spot, twist your wrist in small circles as you paint and wiggle the beam over the entire surface to be painted. When your 30 seconds is up, check your histogram to ensure all the data is in and slightly balanced to the center or center right without going off either end of the graph. If the subject is too brightly lit by the flashlight, then paint for less than the full exposure time. Continue a few exposures at 30 seconds to get a variety of images to work with back home. The beauty of a light painted image is that no two are the same!

©Splotchy uneven lighting on the subject is part of the charm of light painted images.

©Samantha Chrysanthou РSplotchy uneven lighting on the subject is part of the charm of light painted images.

©Darwin Wiggett - Each frame will have different looks because you can never move light over the subject in exactly the same manner.

©Darwin Wiggett РEach frame will have a different look because you can never move light over the subject in exactly the same manner.

As the light dims, you will quickly find that 30 seconds is not enough time to expose your subject properly. Since you are on the bulb setting, you can keep the shutter open as long as you like (either on timer or with a locking mechanism on a cable release). As soon as 30 seconds produces a histogram that is becoming biased to the left (that is, underexposed), you will need to let in more light. A handy rule of thumb is to double your exposure time. Try a 60-second exposure and check your histogram. As the light continues to dim, double your exposure time if needed for the next photograph. There is no hard and fast rule; the trick is to interpret the histogram and adjust your exposure time as the histogram shows the image is becoming underexposed. When you are up to 4 minutes exposure time, you may wish to dial your aperture to f11 or f8 (if depth of field is not critical) to let even more light into the camera. You can keep shooting as long as you like, but keep in mind at some point the ambient light will not be strong enough to record behind your subject and separate it from the background. This is why light painting works best at dusk or dawn and not when it’s dark out. For long-exposure effects, look for wind-blown grasses or moving clouds. With this easy method, I get consistent results without having to bother with calculations (math is nasty!) or lugging around extra gear.

©Darwin Wiggett - Four minute exposure with northern lights in the background

©Darwin Wiggett РFour minute exposure with northern lights in the background

 

©Samantha Chrysanthou - Darwin goofing around on Halloween night.

©Samantha Chrysanthou РDarwin goofing around on Halloween night.

winking pumpkin

©Samantha Chrysanthou РHappy Halloween!

 

9 October

Scaretography Light Painting Party

It’s Halloween — and time to party! How do photographers celebrate this wacky season? With wickedly good images, of course. We’ve rented a spooky hall in the countryside and planned a full afternoon of light painting, flash effects and a costume party! All the grisly details are here. Can’t make it out? Don’t worry – the October Newsletter will be coming out soon with your monthly challenge – be afraid…be very afraid.

Old door with cracked window

What’s behind the door? ¬©Samantha Chrysanthou

Backlit door opening

Dare you proceed? ©Samantha Chrysanthou

©Darwin Wiggett - Don't be scared!

¬©Darwin Wiggett – Don’t be scared!

Scorched tree

We dare you to attend… ¬©Samantha Chrysanthou

©DarwinWiggett

©DarwinWiggett

winking pumpkin

©Samantha Chrysanthou

 

14 September

The Importance of Shooting for Yourself in this Internet World of Photography

Here at oopoomoo we have always emphasized creative vision in photography. As a photographer you should honour your interests and express those interests from your heart. In short, we try to teach photographers to be artists. Unfortunately, social media and the internet don’t reward the slow path to self discovery but instead it rewards instant gratification, easy to digest imagery and techniques of the day with photographers scurrying all over the globe to get to iconic destinations to make replica images or replicate techniques of other photographers. There is little reward for nurturing your own creative vision. We have written about his extensively before here and here.

Artists stand out with their individual expression - ©Darwin Wiggett - oopoomoo.com

Artists stand out with their individual expression –
©Darwin Wiggett Рoopoomoo.com

Recently, our friend and oopoomoo photography assistant, Catherine returned from taking a workshop with esteemed photographers Freeman Patterson and Andre Gallant. Catherine has long been interested in things that most other photographers pass by. She came with me once on a Canadian Rockies ‘Glory of Autumn’ photography tour and spent her time taking pictures of rocks and sticks while everyone else was making images of mountains and lakes. The other photographers just could not figure out why she was ‘wasting her time’ shooting things she could photograph at home when she was in the Canadian Rockies! The truth was simple – Catherine was following her creative muse, sticks and stone moved her more than big mountain scenes (read about Catherine’s experience at this link). She honoured herself by not caving to peer pressure and shooting for herself. Fast forward to her workshop with Freeman and Andre. Catherine was given an assignment to make reflection shots… in cars. She took to the assignment with gusto and came away with an impressive body of work, so impressive that Freeman singled her out from the class as an example of creative vision. By following her heart, and her interests Catherine emerged as an artist.

Even if no one else 'gets' your work, you still have to do it, you never know what will emerge! - ©Darwin Wiggett - oopoomoo.com

Even if no one else ‘gets’ your work, you still have to do it; you never know what will emerge! – ¬©Darwin Wiggett – oopoomoo.com

Last October Samantha and I came up with a workshop idea in the Canadian Rockies called “Beyond the Icon”. The idea was to strip away the temptation for photographers to make or expect classic Canadian Rockies iconic photos. We went after the fall colours were over but before winter ice and snow set in. It was the season of browns and for many photographers the Rockies looked blah (if that is possible). We also purposely took our participants to unknown locations and even just stopped roadside randomly and gave out photo assignments. The results from the participants were impressive and it was fulfilling to see growth in the participants’ creative vision. Sam and I also had the opportunity to do these same assignments along with the students. And we got to spend some time before and after the workshop making personal images. After the trip I noticed that my creative vision was evolving from big vertical landscapes in theatrical light to more intimate, abstract and graphic images. Recently, I finished processing the images from this outing (finally!) and thought I would share my 25 personal faves from the trip in this post.

What is your creative vision? Have you seen it evolve over time? Are you able to be true to yourself in spite of external pressures to shoot something different from what you love to shoot? We would love hear about it in the comments on this blog or share some images with us on the oopoomoo Facebook Group.

©Darwin Wiggett - oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett Рoopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett - oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett Рoopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett - oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett Рoopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett - oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett Рoopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett - oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett Рoopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett - oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett Рoopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett - oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett Рoopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett - oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett Рoopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett - oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett Рoopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett - oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett Рoopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett - oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett Рoopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett - oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett Рoopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett - oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett Рoopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett - oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett Рoopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett - oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett Рoopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett - oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett Рoopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett - oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett Рoopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett - oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett Рoopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett - oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett Рoopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett - oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett Рoopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett - oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett Рoopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett - oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett Рoopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett - oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett Рoopoomoo.com

 

25 May

Debunking the Myth that Gear Makes the Photographer: Part II – Level the Playing Field

(This is Part II; click here to read Part I first!)

In this article, we discuss why classroom seminars AND field sessions are synergistic learning tools – don’t skip one in favour of the other! Remember we are using our upcoming Montreal weekend event as a case study to exemplify our point.

Level the Playing Field

So you arrive at your photo destination. As you come into the present moment, you tune into your senses and your mind is engaged. Photographic possibilities start to jump out at you. You take out your camera and begin exploring.

Or…you arrive and have no idea where to start, what to shoot. If this is you, make sure you read Part I and get thee to a seminar on Learning to See, like the one we are giving in Montreal on June 6! Taking a course on perception is your top priority. Don’t register for any field session photography workshop until you practice learning to see!

Are you ready for the field? Have you honed your ability to 'learn to see"?

Are you ready for the field? Have you honed your ability to ‘learn to see”?

©Darwin Wiggett - There are alwys photos beyond the obvious if you know how to see.

¬©Darwin Wiggett – There are always photos beyond the obvious if you know how to ‘see’.

Ok, you‚Äôve arrived, you‚Äôre starting to get in the photographic groove‚Ķand you‚Äôre struggling with the assignments we‚Äôve given you after our seminar. That‚Äôs good! We believe in helping cement the information provided in the full day seminar with targeted assignments designed to develop the three key skills that make a good photographer. Since we concentrate on field technique over digital darkroom work, we ask everyone to shoot JPEG (either raw + JPEG or just JPEG). This levels the playing field in that everyone is working on the same skills at the same time. We want to know if you‚Äôve understood everything we discussed about seeing the nature and quality of light and how it affects tone in, for example, our Montreal seminar Harnessing the Power of Tone. And we want to see you build advanced compositional patterns to convey your photographic idea as demonstrated in Montreal’s¬†Working Advanced Compositional Patterns talk (we are also giving this seminar in Black Diamond, Alberta, May 31). There‚Äôs usually a bit of whining when we make photographers hand in their JPEGs without benefit of digital processing. But the danger to be aware of is that ‚Äėfixing‚Äô your images on the computer makes you lazy. If you do most of your creative work on the computer, then you‚Äôre a digital artist, not a photographer. There‚Äôs nothing at all wrong with this. But we are teaching a photography course, so we want to see your field skills. You might be surprised and invigorated after a session spent focusing on your field skills! And the good news is that when everyone is shooting in-camera JPEGs it really shows that equipment does not matter; great images are often made with the simplest and least expensive cameras.

©Samantha Chrysanthou - Shooting JPEGS is hard, you need to get everything right in the camera - are you up for the challenge!

©Samantha Chrysanthou РShooting JPEGs is hard; you need to get everything right in the camera. Are you up for the challenge?

There’s a reason why we encourage photographers to attend our seminars as well as our associated field sessions and that is because it’s a two-part strategy to learning. You receive the information and then you head out and test your learning. Attending just a field session without the benefit of the Saturday seminar puts you at a disadvantage. This is true for all our workshops, and we structure them this way because we’ve found that people learn the most with this format.

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett РYou learn most by stretching yourself!

So if you have registered for a field session in Montreal but are saving money by skipping the seminar (you know all that stuff, right?) we strongly advise you to register for both. Did you take the quiz in Part I? Seriously, compared to what most photographers spend on their gear, this seminar costs pennies compared to most photographers’ gear expenditures but will give you more than a year’s worth of education.

And this goes for any photo educational offering you‚Äôre considering‚Ķhow much instruction is offered? How large are the class sizes? The field sessions? Is there a constructive feedback session afterwards to review your learning? Does the instructor build upon concepts taught in class or does the instructor just ‚Äėshow up‚Äô to the field sessions? Does the instructor actively engage with you after the seminar either through social media commentary or answers to your email questions? Also, remember photo tours are about location and being guided to photogenic spots, whereas workshops should teach you to be creative no matter where you find yourself. Are you up for being creative?

North Saskatchewan River, Banff National Park, Alberta, Canada - Rokinon 85mm lens at f11

©Darwin Wiggett РAlways evaluate your instructors in terms of their care in follow-up.

Nourishing Feedback, not Pablum, Please!

Speaking of feedback, let‚Äôs make it count. While it can be gratifying to get ‚Äėlikes‚Äô on social media, these are vague and unhelpful. What did the viewer like? What did the viewer even think the image was about? What could be improved?

In our field sessions, we always try and schedule a feedback session after each outing. This not a time of criticism but rather a chance for you to see your work on the big screen and receive suggestions from your peers as to ways to improve and what they liked about your image. We also provide our comments but encourage class participation. Many students have told us that they learned the most during this constructive session. It’s a perfect way to cap off a full and fun weekend of photography!

Investing in a photo event like Montreal’s Learning to See: Developing Your Creative Vision is about you getting the best value for your buck. It’s about truly becoming a better photographer. So consider your educational options the next time you are thinking of upgrading your gear.

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett РSam says Get yer creativity on June 5-7 in Montreal!

21 May

Debunking the Myth that Gear Makes the Photographer: Part I

We‚Äôve probably all heard it at some point when showing our images, that insidious insult dressed up as a compliment, ‚ÄúWow, you must have a really good camera!‚ÄĚ Why is it that people think a good photo is the result of good gear? And why do photographers rush out to upgrade to the latest camera body yet drag their feet when it comes to investing in photo education?

©Darwin Wiggett - Is Frans Lanting a great photographer because of the gear he uses?

©Darwin Wiggett РIs Frans Lanting a great photographer because of the gear he uses?

We think it’s a big fat myth that buying more and better gear will make you a better photographer, and yet that myth is alive and well out there. We are going to try and debunk this myth using our final photography workshop this spring, Learning to See: Developing Your Creative Vision in Montreal, June 5-7 as a case example. Tell us if we’ve convinced you. So here goes.

The Camera vs Your Brain

A camera is really just a black box made up of plastic, glass and metal. Your brain, on the other hand, is a marvel: coils and folds of squiggly grey matter are infiltrated with a network of delicate neurons that charge and fire and create ‚Äď thought! Your life experiences shape your thoughts and interests, and your interests and thoughts create your images. A camera is by nature inert. It takes you, the photographer, to point the camera‚Äôs eye to something you deem worth photographing. It is you who decides which settings to use to portray your subject and it is you who pinpoints the split second to press the shutter.

©Darwin Wiggett - Its the grey matter behind the camera that matters most.

¬©Darwin Wiggett – It’s the grey matter behind the camera that matters most.

In other words, the camera is like a helpful slave that carries out your bidding. True, a camera can help the photographer by ‚Äėguessing‚Äô at some of the settings required to make certain photos such as is found with certain program modes, but even if you shoot on Auto Everything, you are the one who decides what to photograph. There is always a mind behind the shot, so insinuating that it is the camera that makes a good photo ignores the mind behind the photo.

©Darwin Wiggett - Where you point the camera and what you decide is worth photographing is not up to the camera!

©Darwin Wiggett РWhere you point the camera and what you decide is worth photographing is not up to the camera!

Three Things Make a Good Photographer

What then makes a good photographer if not gear? Essentially, there are three skills that make a good photographer, and we’ve built our Montreal seminar around all three. First, a skilled photographer is one who can translate his thoughts, interests and experiences about a subject matter into an image. Remember that squiggly grey matter perched atop your spine? The germ of an image starts there, in those firing synapses. For example, in Montreal this June, our first topic in the Saturday seminar is Learning to See: The Art of Perception. This talk covers that crucial skill of being able to quickly perceive photographic potential in a moment in time. If you sometimes think there’s nothing to shoot here, then this is the skill you need to work on. Quite frankly, in our experience teaching photography for years, this is an area where many photographers are weak. No amount of gear is going to tell you what is a good moment to capture. In fact, we sometimes see an inverse relationship between the amount of gear a photographer carries and his ability to see! Gear can be a barrier in the way of true seeing.

Too much gear limits your ability to 'see'.

Too much gear limits your ability to ‘see’.

Second, not only do you have to be able to recognize the photographic potential in a split second, but you also then need to use every tool at your disposal to churn that moment into a final, complete image. This means understanding the creative power of camera controls such as aperture and shutter speed, and are fluent in the language of photography ‚Äď composition. Do you know what the elements of visual design are? If not, get thee to an educational seminar! And guess what we teach in Montreal‚Ķyou guessed it: Harvesting the Power of Tone for Compelling Images and Working Advanced Compositional Patterns in the Landscape.

©Samantha Chrysanthou

©Samantha Chrysanthou

Third, photographers need to understand themselves, what makes them tick. This is the key to developing personal style. If you don’t know and understand what motivates you to shoot, how can you follow your own creative vision? Do you find yourself copying other photographers’ work? Or are you comfortable with your own way of looking at the world? Creative Vision and Personal Style, our final talk on Saturday, addresses this important topic. By the way, in this talk, we reveal which is more important, vision or style, and why.

©Samantha Chrysanthou

©Samantha Chrysanthou

Take the Quiz

We‚Äôre going to end Part I of this topic with a little test. Grab all your camera gear and accessories and lay ‚Äėem out. Make a list of your gear and its retail value at time of purchase. Now make a list of any dedicated computer equipment and software (e.g. special, high resolution monitors, photo processing software, extra hard drives etc.) and note the cost of this equipment at time of purchase. Tally it all up.

How much camera stuff do you own?

How much camera stuff do you own?

Now think back to this year. What photography talks, seminars or workshops have you attended? Write them down and note their cost. Write down any educational eBooks you‚Äôve purchased and their cost ‚Äď but only if you‚Äôve read them! Unread educational material does not count nor do photo tours with no educational component. What about the year prior? Tally up the amounts you‚Äôve spent on photo education in the last several years.

How much do you invest in your photography education?

How much do you invest in your photography education?

Compare the two columns. Does the gear/software column greatly outnumber the photo educational column? Have you spent more than $2000 in gear over the last year or so? More than $5,000? $10,000? If so, perhaps it’s time to invest in yourself, and stop lining retailers’ pocketbooks. The only way to be a better photographer is to invest in quality education. The Montreal weekend ranges from $75 Р$95 per event. That’s a steal, folks.

Stay tuned for Part II where we level the playing field in our outdoor sessions and get serious with photo feedback.

©Samantha Chrysanthou

©Samantha Chrysanthou

29 April

Updated Spring Workshop Schedule – oopoomoo Photography Workshops Across Canada!

We just returned from a 3-day photo seminar with field workshops in Toronto where we met wonderful people and received some very positive feedback about our content, presentation and teaching style. John Weatherburn, past president of the Toronto Digital Photography Club related this to us:

Thanks again for spending the weekend with us. It was a very informative seminar and set of workshops. I have received very positive feedback from our members. I would say more so than with any other speaker!
The two of you working together works perfectly. Your complimentary interests illustrate clearly that there is no wrong way. Even using different equipment works well (always a debate in the club: Canon vs. Nikon!).

We love it when we can impart the oopoomoo values of create, inspire and educate¬†to photography. The great thing is we learn just as much from our students as they do from us; it’s truly a collaborative adventure. Thanks, Toronto, for your hospitality and warmth and open hearts!

Next up on our schedule are the following events – we’d love to meet you and help you take your photography to a new creative and artistic level. To learn more about each event just click on the title for the event that interests you.

Creating Story and Mood in Photography
Winnipeg, Manitoba – May 2 and 3, 2015
©Samantha Chrysanthou

©Samantha Chrysanthou

Camera Controls Made Easy – From Confused to Creative in Four Hours!
Black Diamond, Alberta – May 9, 2015 – Sold Outwait list only
©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

Creative Landscape Photography Weekend Intensive Workshop
Edmonton, Alberta – May 22 – 24, 2015 –¬†Sold Outwait list only
©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

NEWWorking Advanced Compositional Patterns in the Landscape
Black Diamond Alberta – May 31, 2015
©Samantha Chrysanthou

©Samantha Chrysanthou

Learning to See: Developing Your Creative Vision
Montreal, Quebec – June 5 – 7, 2015
©Samantha Chrysanthou

©Samantha Chrysanthou

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