29 April

Updated Spring Workshop Schedule – oopoomoo Photography Workshops Across Canada!

We just returned from a 3-day photo seminar with field workshops in Toronto where we met wonderful people and received some very positive feedback about our content, presentation and teaching style. John Weatherburn, past president of the Toronto Digital Photography Club related this to us:

Thanks again for spending the weekend with us. It was a very informative seminar and set of workshops. I have received very positive feedback from our members. I would say more so than with any other speaker!
The two of you working together works perfectly. Your complimentary interests illustrate clearly that there is no wrong way. Even using different equipment works well (always a debate in the club: Canon vs. Nikon!).

We love it when we can impart the oopoomoo values of create, inspire and educate to photography. The great thing is we learn just as much from our students as they do from us; it’s truly a collaborative adventure. Thanks, Toronto, for your hospitality and warmth and open hearts!

Next up on our schedule are the following events – we’d love to meet you and help you take your photography to a new creative and artistic level. To learn more about each event just click on the title for the event that interests you.

Creating Story and Mood in Photography
Winnipeg, Manitoba – May 2 and 3, 2015
©Samantha Chrysanthou

©Samantha Chrysanthou

Camera Controls Made Easy – From Confused to Creative in Four Hours!
Black Diamond, Alberta – May 9, 2015 – Sold Outwait list only
©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

Creative Landscape Photography Weekend Intensive Workshop
Edmonton, Alberta – May 22 – 24, 2015 – Sold Outwait list only
©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

NEWWorking Advanced Compositional Patterns in the Landscape
Black Diamond Alberta – May 31, 2015
©Samantha Chrysanthou

©Samantha Chrysanthou

Learning to See: Developing Your Creative Vision
Montreal, Quebec – June 5 – 7, 2015
©Samantha Chrysanthou

©Samantha Chrysanthou

23 April

Celebrating the 10 Year Anniversary of “How to Photograph the Canadian Rockies”

It’s hard to believe but it was 10 years ago this week that my guidebook How to Photograph the Canadian Rockies was released!

HowtoPhoto-OFC-750px

In 2004, my career as a photographer was suffering because my main source of income, stock photography, had taken a big hit after the market shocks following 9/11 in 2001. I needed something to rejuvenate my career. So I came up with the idea of writing a photographers’ guide book to the Canadian Rockies, a region I knew and loved well. I pitched the idea to a publisher and in April of 2004, with an advance from the publisher in my pocket, I headed to the Rockies to shoot new images and do on-the-ground research for the book. I finished shooting and writing in September of 2004 and turned the manuscript over to publisher who released it in April of 2005. Once the publisher saw the photos I submitted for the guide book, they asked if I would also be willing to do a coffee table book as a companion piece. They called the book Dances with Light – The Canadian Rockies and it was released at the end of April 2005. Both books became Canadian best sellers and each went through three sucessive printings. I’m sure the books would have sold even more copies but the publisher went bankrupt because they expanded too big, too fast. Unfortunately, both books are now out of print. New copies of How to Photograph the Canadian Rockies now sell on Amazon starting at $250.oo! It’s original price was $14.95. Crazy.

Dances-OFC-750

Once the publisher went out of business, I bought the remaining copies of How to Photograph the Canadian Rockies (HTPTCR) and sold them through my website – sales were brisk! Once those books were gone, I asked Stephen DesRoches to help me update and design the content as eBooks for specific regions of the Canadian Rockies – we called these eGuides. I took the original content of HTPTCR, added new locations, more photos and updated the descriptions and sold the eGuides by park and by season. Later, when Samantha and I formed our joint company, oopoomoo, we added new locations (the Kootenay Plains) that were not in the original book. And finally, we asked John Marriott, the premier wildlife photographer of the Rockies, to write a title on wildlife photography for the HTPTCR series of eGuides. The result is our eight title library on the Canadian Rockies. Many, many photographers have used our eGuides over the years and our inbox is full of high praise from photographers grateful to us for saving them time and getting them to awesome locations in the right light. In fact, we know of several photographers who have used our eGuides to help them take people on Canadian Rockies photo tours. You know you did a good job when others can take your information and successfully design a photo tour!

NMP15414

©Darwin Wiggett

To celebrate 10 years of guiding photographers to the right place at the right time either through our eGuides or through our tours and workshops, we are bundling our complete collection of Rockies eGuides into one specially priced package. To buy these eGuides individually costs $80, but now you can buy all eight eGuides for only $60 (basically, you get two eGuides for free). Happy Anniversary!

How to Photograph the Canadian Rockies

How to Photograph the Canadian Rockies – The Complete Collection

Stay tuned to this blog because Sam and I will be celebrating this milestone by sharing some of our unpublished Canadian Rockies photos. It’s still a place that makes my heart swell with happiness. We would only add one little plea to this post…please, as Albertans, Canadians and passionate photographers from all over the world, let’s take care of this region and treat it with the respect it deserves.

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

©Samantha Chrysanthou

©Samantha Chrysanthou

29 March

Creative Camera Controls Workshop – Are You Ready to be the Boss of Your Camera?

Hot off the press! Bluerock Gallery in Black Diamond, Alberta, has asked us to teach a photography course at their gallery. We are flattered they approached us since we think Bluerock Gallery is one of the best venues showcasing amazing art – many from talented locals. For our topic, Samantha and I decided on one of our most popular and requested topics: camera controls. All too often, photographers vastly under utilize the power of aperture, shutter speed and ISO and the impact these humble settings have on the look and feel of your image. Camera controls are commonly taught by people who love jargon and math…we don’t really care for either, so we teach you how to get creative with camera controls in a simple, intuitive way.

So, want to go from confused to creative in just four hours? Even advanced shooters have told us they see the world in a fresh way after we explain the magic of camera controls! There are two dates to choose from, April 12 or May 9. See this link for more. These are our only local workshops scheduled so far for this year, so locals, grab your camera, and a tripod if you have one, and come out to our hands-on, informative and fun workshop!

Below are a few photos illustrating the creative power of camera controls!

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

©Samantha Chrysanthou

©Samantha Chrysanthou

©Samantha Chrysanthou

©Samantha Chrysanthou

©Samantha Chrysanthou

©Samantha Chrysanthou

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

©Samantha Chrysanthou

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

28 January

Behind the Scenes on the Creative Sabbatical

Attention locals! If you want to catch up with some of our adventures on our Creative Sabbatical so far, including a candid presentation about a personal project we’ve been working on during our sabbatical, we’ll be speaking at this event in Calgary, January 31.

Cabin Fever 2015As many of you know, we are on Creative Sabbatical until summer, 2015. Along with developing our personal creativity through photography projects, we’ve also been searching for ways to align our business and lifestyle even further with sustainable principles. Despite having teal as its dominant colour, oopoomoo has always been green at heart. Currently, we live in the ‘burbs and aren’t sure if we want to stay there. Our presentation shares the highs (and lows!) that occur when you boot yourself out of your comfortable routine in order to evaluate your life and life’s work.

Lace yer boots and get questin'!

Lace yer boots and get questin’!

This event isn’t just for greenies: most of us with a pulse will admit that we’re in some challenging times. With Alberta’s economy welded to the price of oil, all our fortunes are tied to a carnival ride of market luck. Many people we’ve spoken to over the last few years feel the need for more control over their time and health and are searching for ways to get there. Well, there’s loads of practical info at this event presented by some of Alberta’s most forward-thinking, solutions-based entrepreneurs. The presentations vary in scope from specific and skill-based, such as wielding sharp hand tools (safely!) to big-picture design like siting and building your own home. Stomp down the winter blahs with music, food and dance in the evening!

This event is put on by the Permaculture Calgary Guild. We’ve written about permaculture before, and how we think its systems-based, ‘start-small’, principled approach to the massive problems facing humanity might actually work. Rob Avis over at Verge Permaculture does a good job of debunking some of the misconceptions surrounding permaculture on his blog. If you smell unwashed hippies when you hear the word ‘permaculture’, you’re behind the times. Read Rob’s post.

You don’t have to want to change the world to enjoy this event. You just have to realize that this world is all we’ve got. Maybe see you there!

And finally, we have 2 free tickets to give away for both the workshops and the party ($70 value). All you have do is make a comment below about what you have done in your life to make things a little softer on our good old Earth. We’ll do a random draw and award our winner on this Friday, January 30 at 2 PM MST.

Permaculture is so much more than just gardening!

Permaculture is so much more than just gardening!

18 December

Lessons from Antarctica

We were very fortunate to have been invited on an 18-day cruise with One Ocean Expeditions to the Antarctic Peninsula with stops at the Falkland Islands and South Georgia as part of a Photographic Symposium. We thought we would share with you some lessons learned from this adventure to the bottom of the world.

Cruising out of Ushuaia, Agentina

©Darwin Wiggett – Samantha cruising out of Ushuaia, Argentina

Darwin on the Antarctic Peninsula

©Samantha Chrysanthou – Darwin on the Antarctic Peninsula

Nature is Awe-Inspiring!

We all need nature in our lives and the more we connect with nature, the more we feel whole. We could see the impact that this wilderness had on people… many were moved to tears by the overwhelming enormity of the place or by the interaction they had with the wildlife. While we were not to approach wildlife, if we were quiet and still, it would eventually pass close by. Even the most hardened among us will melt when a penguin waddles up for a face-to-face encounter or an elephant seal pup snuggles near your leg. For most people, Antarctica is one of the most intense direct encounters with nature they will ever have. This place leaves its mark!

©Darwin Wiggett - Penguin encounter on the Falkland Islands

©Darwin Wiggett – Penguin encounter on the Falkland Islands

©Darwin Wiggett - Who needs a telephoto lens?

©Darwin Wiggett – Who needs a telephoto lens?

Yet the World is Smaller than We Think

For modern humans, traveling to the end of the world is really no big deal. What used to be epic and dangerous and scary is now just a little inconvenient. The hardest part of the journey is waiting in lines at airports and deciding what movies to choose while you jet across the stratosphere at 600 MPH. Even in Antarctica, where one might think travel is extreme, our toughest choices were whether we should skip the bacon for breakfast and eat the healthy selection of fruit instead. Excursions ashore were safely negotiated in zodiacs with rarely a drop of water splashing us in our expedition wetsuits. The only danger we really faced was that of our own making when we got so carried away with photography that we forgot to watch our step and slipped in some penguin guano. We were impressed (or depressed) by just how accessible the Antarctic wilderness is. Humans are everywhere on this small planet and you can see our ‘footprint’ no matter where you go. Can this wilderness survive the sheer demands and impact that humans have on this planet?

©Darwin Wiggett - Humans are everywhere, are impact is felt to the ends of the earth.

©Darwin Wiggett – Humans are everywhere; our impact is felt to the ends of the earth.

©Samantha Chrysanthou - Chinstrap Penguins on the run!

©Samantha Chrysanthou – Chinstrap Penguins on the run!

When it Comes to Gear, Less is More

Big cameras, big lenses and travel just don’t mix. This trip was full of photographers with the latest full-frame dSLRs and large, fast telephoto lenses. The amount of camera gear weighing down the zodiacs was astounding. Giant bags of gear and bulky expedition wetskins meant most photographers’ walks on shore maxed out at 100 meters. Hauling all that gear made people tired and soon they had no energy to be creative. Some of the best photos we saw on the trip were made by the spouses of more ‘serious’ photographers: with just a point-n-shoot in hand, the spouses could be more spontaneous in the changing conditions and grabbed great photos while their gear-laden partner fiddled with their equipment.  A small lightweight and responsive kit is the way to go. It wasn’t long into the trip when photographers with two systems (e.g. dSLR versus small mirrorless camera or a point-n-shoot) were leaving the big guns behind in the boat for the joy of a small camera.

©Darwin Wiggett - The burden of big gear!

©Darwin Wiggett – The burden of big gear!

©Darwin Wiggett - The joy of small gear!

©Darwin Wiggett – The joy of small gear!

Speaking of Cameras, They Sometimes Get in the Way

This trip was full of photographers. They take pictures, constantly. A camera is always in front of their face. Some photographers never really saw Antarctica except through the filter of the camera. They interacted more with the box than the environment. In fact several of the staff who have done dozens of trips to Antarctica told us that this group was the most disconnected from nature of any group they have ever seen. Nature photographers disconnected from nature? But it was true – to really appreciate this place, we learned that you had put the camera down and just look and be in the moment. In our busy lives, we have forgotten how to just take things in… we are so programmed to do and to produce. Some of our favorite memories are not the photos but the quiet moments of observation.

©Darwin Wiggett - We often kept our gear packed away and just spent time observing nature.

©Darwin Wiggett – We often kept our gear packed away and just spent time observing nature.

Speaking of Observation, Fur Seals are Scary!

We admit it’s hard to concentrate on photos or quiet nature observation when you are fearing for your life! Fur seals love to charge and bite humans. We can’t blame them, we are passing through their territory and they want to chase us out. But dodging fur seals can be stressful. Take us back and put us in the Canadian Rockies with a few grizzly bears and we’ll feel much safer!

©Darwin Wiggett - Clearing the path of fur seals

©Darwin Wiggett – Keeping the fur seals off the human path

Being Offline was Awesome!

We were offline for over three weeks and we loved it. The constant barrage of email and social media is just so much noise in the modern world. Being disconnected so we could fully connect with nature was just so great! We highly recommend at least one sabbatical away from the internet per year!

©Samantha Chrysanthou - Being offline and constantly in nature was amazing!

©Samantha Chrysanthou – Being offline and constantly in nature was amazing!

And Finally…You Don’t Have to Travel Far to be Inspired

For us, our trip to Antarctica reinforced something we already know. Here in Canada we live in a country of awesome natural beauty. There is a lifetime of inspiration here… let’s not take what we have for granted. No matter where you live there is little need to travel far if inspiration is what you crave.

©Darwin Wiggett - Inspiration happens anywhere you are and anywhere you look.

©Darwin Wiggett – Inspiration happens anywhere you are and anywhere you look.

To watch a video of our trip with photos from the symposium’s participants compiled and produced by Daisy Gilardini and David MacEown, please see this link.

 

15 December

Results from the 2014 Fire and Ice in the Canadian Rockies Photo Workshop

As many of you know, Samantha and I are taking a sabbatical from our busy workshop teaching schedule to concentrate on our own photography and projects in 2015. We do have a limited number of teaching seminars in the spring but we won’t be doing field workshops out of Aurum Lodge in the Canadian Rockies in 2015. Our final field workshop ended  with November’s Fire and Ice workshop and we had a great time. We had a group of dedicated and talented photographers who made the most of this year’s unseasonably warm weather. Ice was hard to find and the only fire we got was from overheating in our winter gear! Nevertheless, our crew was open to what nature gave us and we think you’ll agree based on the photos below that no matter what the light or the weather there is always something amazing to photograph if you are open to seeing.

Derek Chambers

Image by Derek Chambers

Image by Derek Chambers

Image by Derek Chambers

Image by Derek Chambers

Image by Derek Chambers

Image by Derek Chambers

Jay Guilmette

Image by Jay Guilmette

Image by Jay Guilmette

Image by Jay Guilmette

Image by Jay Guilmette

Image by Jay Guilmette

Image by Jay Guilmette

Rick Andrews

Image by Rick Andrews

Image by Rick Andrews

Image by Rick Andrews

Image by Rick Andrews

Image by Rick Andrews

Image by Rick Andrews

Kim Odland

Image by Kim Odland

Image by Kim Odland

Image by Kim Odland

Image by Kim Odland

Image by Kim Odland

Image by Kim Odland

 

 

12 November

oopoomoo goes to Antarctica!

We are thrilled and delighted to be going to Antarctica on an 18 day photographic symposium. And we are leaving today! It has been a crazy summer and fall with a tonne of workshops, seminars and our photographers in residence program at Aurum Lodge winding down. And now we end the year with nearly a month in Buenos Aires and Antarctica! Who knows what is next on our crazy year long sabbatical?

©Darwin Wiggett - Wow a cruise - so exciting!

©Darwin Wiggett – Wow a cruise – so exciting!

We have decided to go light on this trip with just a cropped sensor dSLR  and a couple of lenses each. We want to make sure that we spend a lot of time engaged with nature and not distracted by a bunch of camera gear – a light kit will allow us to enjoy our trip of a lifetime and still snap a photo or two if it feels appropriate.

In the meantime we’ll be away from the blog, our email and our oopoomoo Facebook group. We hope you continue to post and interact there shooting for the November theme of backways and alleyways for a chance to win our Photography Fundamentals eBook bundle. While we’re away, we’ll have blog posts scheduled for your reading pleasure. And we’ll still have a December photography challenge to keep things rolling on the Facebook page – watch for the December challenge announced here on the blog (hint: it may have something to do with our upcoming article in Popular Photography on winter abstracts!) It seems we can’t escape shooting snow and ice but now we’ll have penguins in the mix! The prize for December’s challenge winner is a copy of Darwin’s career retrospective, 50 at 50. Thanks to all for your support and participation and most of all inspiration. We’ll talk soon.

I probably won;t miss all this crap? Give me a wee kit and a big adventure ;-)

I probably won’t miss all this crap! Give me a wee kit and a big adventure 😉

2 November

The Results Are In – Beyond the Icon in the Canadian Rockies

A few weeks ago we held our first Beyond the Icon photography workshop where we asked participants to dig deeper and go beyond shooting the obvious and to discover their own creative vision. We had an intrepid crew that took up this challenge and we are pleased to present their three favorite photos each.

Bob Costall

©Bob Costall

©Bob Costall

©Bob Costall

©Bob Costall

©Bob Costall

©Bob Costall

David Klautt

©David Klautt

©David Klautt

©David Klautt

©David Klautt

©David Klautt

©David Klautt

Ken Carlson

©Ken Carlson

©Ken Carlson

©Ken Carlson

©Ken Carlson

©Ken Carlson

©Ken Carlson

Brian Graham

©Brian Graham

©Brian Graham

©Brian Graham

©Brian Graham

©Brian Graham

©Brian Graham

27 October

Fire and Ice in the Canadian Rockies – November is a Great Time for Photography!

November is the month that has the least visitors coming to the Rockies. It is too cold to camp, no ski hills are open yet, and most photographers prefer the big colours of September and the winter wonderland of February. But I love November because it’s an awesome transition season from  autumn to winter. The lakes are fringed with ice but still have open water. The light is low and sweet most of the day. Fresh snow can sugar-frost the peaks and the forests. There are a lot of opportunities to find little surprises suspended in ice and the day length is so civilized (no early rising for sunrise and sunset happens before supper time). Plus there are just so few people, you have the place to yourself. It was for all these reasons that I have been doing Fire and Ice tours in the Rockies since 2007. This year, 2014, Samantha and and I are running the Fire and Ice outing as a workshop which means it’s an intensive learning, shooting and critique-based experience where we will hone the participants’ creative vision. We have a couple of spots left in this workshop November 4 – 9, 2014. Come out and see what you can do with this crazy time of seasonal transition. Below are 20 favorite images I have made on Fire and Ice outings.

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

20 October

Chasing the Icon; a Checklist for Failure?

This article was originally published in Outdoor Photography Canada magazine several years ago. Be sure to subscribe to see the latest work from great photographers across Canada.

Chasing the Icon

Photographers are like birders. For a lot of birders, what matters most is the sighting of a species so you can check off that bird from your list. The more species sighted the better. The same is true for many photographers; the number of iconic locations captured adds notches to your photography belt. Taj Mahal? Got it! Delicate Arch? Nabbed! Niagara Falls? You bet! But does a portfolio full of the grand wonders of the World make you a better photographer? I doubt it.

©Darwin Wiggett - Niagara Falls

©Darwin Wiggett – The daily rainbow at Niagara Falls

The internet has made finding, knowing and sharing information about photo locations very easy. Do a little research, look at a few photos online and you’ll know exactly where and when to go get the best sighting. And once you get to an icon you’ll line up with hundreds of other photographers all trying to make the same shot. What’s the point?

©Darwin Wiggett - At most icons dozens of photographers line up every sunrise to make the same image.

©Darwin Wiggett – At most icons dozens of photographers line up every sunrise to make the same image. Even lesser known spots are now attracting photographers who search farther and wider to get another icon checked off their life list.

In the past, the portfolios of photographers were full of work from lesser known local areas, and the images showed more creative vision because people were shooting for themselves and not trying to copy someone else’s iconic image. In short, there was a personal stamp on each photographer’s work because they were reacting to the scene personally.

©Samantha Chrysanthou

©Samantha Chrysanthou

Fast forward to the app-driven ‘iPhotography’ world of today and everything looks the same. In the portfolios I review, I see all the same trophy locations, with similar compositions, all processed with the same software plug-ins. The results are homogenous and boring. What has happened to personal expression?

©Darwin Wiggett - Ho Hum, not another Moraine Lake photo at sunrise.

©Darwin Wiggett – Ho Hum, not another Moraine Lake photo at sunrise.

I think what’s happened is that we’ve lost touch with why we go out to make photos in the first place. For most of us who do nature photography, we go out because we want to connect with nature. The more we actually take the time, look around and be in nature, the better our photography will be. A National Geographic photographer once said that the way to get good enough to work for the magazine was to choose one subject or location, preferably close to home, that you can revisit over and over again and really get to know well. The better you know the subject or location, the deeper you’ll dig to create unique images with your personal stamp. And the more your personal style emerges, the more likely you’ll be sought after by the magazine.

©Darwin Wiggett - Great photography should not be location dependent but should be photographer dependent.

©Darwin Wiggett – Great photography should not be location dependent but should be photographer dependent.

For me, I’ve found that when I travel if I just visit one or two spots and concentrate on getting to know those locations, then my photography soars. If I chase icons and try to capture as many locations as possible, then my photography and the experience of the trip is unremarkable. So, just like the birder who specializes in one or two species and has a depth of knowledge and personal experience with those species, so too will the photographer who moves beyond the icon checklist encourage a deeper engagement and portrayal of their subjects.

©Darwin Wiggett - Just like the Raven in its territory, get to know one or two areas really well and you'll find the juiciest morsels to sink your dip your beak into for Creative sustenance.

©Darwin Wiggett – Just like the raven in its territory, get to know one or two areas really well and you’ll find the juiciest morsels to sink  your beak into for creative sustenance.

This week we are hosting our Beyond the Icon: Intimate Landscapes of the Canadian Rockies photography workshop where we’ll help our participants bring out their creative vision. I am sure we’ll be blown away by the images made during this workshop as each photographer digs into their well of personal seeing. If you have time this November and you are interested in an intensive creative learning experience we do have a couple of spots left in our Fire and Ice in the Canadian Rockies workshop where we’ll visit the edges of fall and winter in a time when few photographers visit the Rockies. Nothing inspires creativity more than having to look beyond the obvious and November always pushes us to see deeper.

©Darwin Wiggett - The transition from fall to winter is a spark that fuels creative expression.

©Darwin Wiggett – The transition from fall to winter is a spark that fuels creative expression.

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