5 November

A Little Iceland Video (and thank you from oopoomoo)

We are super thrilled that our oopoomoo photography talks have been so well attended and that we have received such great feedback on our little experiment of holding talks in small town Cochrane. Thanks to all of you who have come out and attended! We hope to take our talks further afield next year by making them available on demand on the web. More on that later. For now here is a wee video we presented at our Iceland Talk. And a reminder that, for our final oopoomoo Talk of the season, the incredible Patrick Kane is coming all the way from Yellowknife to tell you how to work with and get published in magazines on November 17! If you live in the Calgary area, be sure to come out and learn more.

2 August

Free Tilt-Shift Instructional Videos: Part IV – Using Live View for Precise Tilt

In the video below, I show you how to use live view with a dSLR to help determine the precise amount of tilt needed to match the plane of focus with the subject plane. In our upcoming  eBook,  The Tilt-Shift Lens Advantage for Outdoor and Nature Photography, Samantha and I have published a short-cut to get you to the right amount of tilt faster than using this live view method. But if precision is what you’re looking for and you have time (the scene isn’t running away), then this method is superior.

The new eBook on tilt-shift lenses has also just been released!

Here is the very ‘exciting’ photo that resulted from the video demo! 😉

Canon 24mm tilt-shift lens tilted so the plane of focus matched the subject plane and then shot at f8 for optimal resolution.

In the real world of landscape photography, replace this corrugated steel with a subject like a seashore, desert, ice or prairie landscape and the principle is the same: tilt so the plane of focus and main subject plane match. For example, in the photo below of a scene in Iceland, I tilted so the plane of focus matched the top of the grass-covered stone wall. I chose an aperture of  f8 not only for good resolution but to increase the depth of field in the photo to cover any areas of the scene that fell out of the subject plane (but most of the scene was pretty much in the same plane as the grassy wall).

Mývatn Iceland

1 August

Free Tilt-Shift Instructional Videos: Part III – Shift and Tilt Movements In Camera

Today we feature two videos: the first one shows how the basic shift and tilt movements of a tilt-shift lens looks through the camera. Our subject is a metal wall from the Nordegg Mine. See how shift and tilt alters the view of this ‘exciting’ subject!

The second video illustrates how we use tilt on the tilt-shift lens to alter the plane of focus to match the subject plane. What the heck does this mean? Watch the video to find out more.

Shot with a 24mm tilt-shift lens with no tilt at an aperture of f3.5; we only get a thin slice of focus!

Shot with a 24mm tilt-shift lens at f3.5 but, this time, the lens was tilted so that the plane of focus matched the subject plane. Now even at f3.5 the entire wall is sharp!

From a practical point of view we use tilt all the time in our landscape photos to ‘bend’ the plane of focus to match the subject plane. For example, in the image of the Iceland church below I used 90mm tilt-shift lens with the lens tilted down so that that lupines, church and mountain all aligned into one plane of focus. Without tilt, I would never achieve focus across the whole scene even with an aperture of f22!

By tilting the lens to match the subject plane and by using an aperture of f13 to add depth-of-field to areas falling out of the subject plane, I was able to get the lupines at my feet and the distant mountains all in focus even with a telephoto focal length (90mm).

Here is what the scene looked like with the lens tilted out of the subject plane!

The new eBook on tilt-shift lenses has also just been released!

31 July

Free Tilt-Shift Instructional Videos: Part II – Using Shift to Correct the Keystone Effect

In the photos and video below, Darwin and I show you how to use shift on a tilt-shift lens to correct a perspective effect that occurs with wide angle focal lengths known as keystoning. In the first photo, Darwin used a wide angle lens (a 24mm) to frame an old building at the Nordegg Mine. Any time a wide angle lens is pointed up to frame a subject (or pointed down) we get problems with straight lines in the scene not being parallel to the edges of the image frame. Look at how the building looks like it’s leaning into the frame: this keystoning can be corrected by making the camera back parallel to the building and then using shift on a tilt-shift lens to return the lens to the original composition. The second photo shows the corrected image using shift. Watch the video to see exactly what we did (warning: high cheese factor!)

By the way if you really, really want to be an expert using tilt-shift lenses, then we invite you to take part in our special one-on-one, hands-on tilt-shift lessons in Kananaskis Country west of Calgary, Alberta (we meet in Bragg Creek). Complete one of these three-hour sessions with Darwin or me, and you’ll be a yogi-master of the tilt-shift lens! Cost for a private session is $300 plus GST. Grab a friend, share the session and pay less at $200 per person (max two participants per session). Contact us at info@oopoomoo.com to set up your session!

The new eBook on tilt-shift lenses has also just been released!

Available dates and times in August are as follows (1st come first served):

August 4: 9 AM – Noon (Full)

August 5: 9 AM – Noon (Full)

August 11: 9 AM – Noon or 3 – 6 PM

August 12: 9 AM – Noon or 3 – 6 PM

©Darwin Wiggett – Image shot with a 24mm lens tilt-shift lens without any shift correction.

©Darwin Wiggett – Image shot with a 24mm tilt-shift lens using shift to correct the keystone effect.

30 July

Free Tilt-Shift Instructional Videos: Part I – Basic Tilt-Shift Movements

In a few days we will launch our long asked for and long awaited eBook, The Tilt-Shift Lens Advantage for Outdoor and Nature Photography. First, we want to thank our fantastic eBook design guru, Stephen Desroches, for an amazing job: this eBook is beautiful! I also want to thank Darwin, for letting me use his tilt shift lenses on occasion in preparation for this publication. 🙂 We hope that this eBook will demystify both the shift and tilt movements of this versatile lens as well as show how we use these specialty lenses as tools for creative outdoor photography. As part of our launch, Darwin and I have made a few instructional videos to supplement the detailed information contained in the eBook. These videos are free; and we’ll launch a new one daily over the next few days. We hope you enjoy!

A Canon TS-E 24mm lens tilted and shifted in the same axis

19 March
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