15 November

Real Life Review – The Rokinon 24mm f3.5 Tilt Shift Lens – A Budget Lens with Big Performance?

Anyone who follows our work knows that Sam and I are crazy for the creative advantages of Tilt Shift lenses for our nature and landscape photography. We are not crazy for the price we have to pay for these specialty lenses though. The Nikon 24mm lens sells for $2200 while the Canon 24mm lens sells for about $2400. Ouch!

Enter the Rokinon/Samyang lens squeezing in at under $900 (street value) and we have a serious alternative to consider. But do you get what you pay for? Is the Rokinon a lesser version of the Nikon and Canon both of which are top drawer lenses in terms of quality? I took the Rokinon out for an oopoomoo Real Life Review during a 4-day trip to the Canadian Rockies. Read below to find out my thoughts on this lens.

The Rokinon 24mm Tilt shift lens - Great value but at what cost?

The Rokinon 24mm tilt shift lens – great value but at what cost?

Initial Impressions
Taking the lens out of the box, I really was surprised by how light and ‘plastic-y’ the lens felt. I am used to the heavy and robust Canon Tilt Shift 24mm f3.5 L II lens which is built like a tank. The Rokinon felt like a plastic toy in comparison.  I was also not impressed by the small tilt and shift knobs. I find the Canon knobs too small and the Rokinon knobs were much smaller than Canon’s! Not great for a working photographer from cold Canada where gloves are survival tools not shooting accessories! The version of the lens I received had small, grey post-like controls for tilt and shift and locking of these movements. Apparently newer versions of the lens have larger knobs (as shown above).

The one thing that did impress me a lot was the fact that the Rokinon lens has independent tilt and shift rotation which is totally cool. The Canon 17 and 24mm tilt shift (version II) lenses also have independent rotation of tilt and shift and I can’t stress enough how much I love and use that feature. The major drawback of Nikon’s suite of tilt shift lenses (and Canon’s older tilt shift lenses) is that the shift and tilt rotation are fixed to one another and this limits the creative effects you can do with these lenses.  Kudos to Rokinon for adding this much needed feature to their budget priced lens. Also kudos to Rokinon for making a lens with a big image circle that has the same degree of tilt and shift capabilities as the Canon 24mm tilt shift lens. Awesome!

©Darwin Wiggett - Here I used tilt to bring the entire subject plane into focus and shift to make a megapixel square image. In this case the shift and tilt on the Rokinon were in the same orientation.

©Darwin Wiggett – Here I used tilt to bring the entire subject plane into focus and shift to make a megapixel square image. In this case the shift and tilt on the Rokinon were in the same orientation.

In the Field with the Rokinon
One of the reasons the Rokinon is a less expensive lens than either the Canon or Nikon tilt shift lenses is that it has a manual aperture ring that is not coupled electronically with the camera body. What this means in practice is that you need to open the lens to f3.5 to do precise focus and tilt movements and then stop the aperture down to the shooting aperture you desire. With a Canon camera and a Canon tilt shift lens, you can set your aperture in advance to whatever aperture you desire. The camera viewfinder or Live View always shows you the view at widest aperture number (e.g. f3.5) making precise focus easy. Simply get focus and shoot no matter what aperture you choose to use in the end. With the Rokinon the process is two step: focus and tilt at f3.5 and then stop down to your shooting aperture and adjust your shutter speed in manual to get proper exposure.

I didn’t mind the extra step in workflow, but what I did mind was the design of the aperture ring right up against the focus ring. Often when I turned the aperture ring to the aperture I wanted to use (mostly f8), I accidentally also moved the focus ring! Drove me crazy! You have to be really careful when turning the aperture ring or else you will nudge the focus and ruin your precisely tilted and focused image.

The aperture ring on the Rokinon is thin and butted up against the focus ring. Even if you have small fingers chances are good you might nudge focus when adjusting aperture.

The aperture ring on the Rokinon is thin and butted up against the focus ring. Even if you have small fingers chances are good you might nudge focus when adjusting aperture.

But is it Sharp?
I can live with a slightly slower workflow, and having to be extra careful with the aperture and focus ring… but if the lens is not sharp what’s the point? OK , so what the verdict?

Well.. the Rokinon is definitely as sharp or sharper than the older Canon 24mm TS-E version I plus it has independent tilt and shift rotation and a bigger image circle and more degrees of tilt and shift. A used Canon 24mm TS-E version I costs about $900. For the same price you could have the Rokinon new and gain many creative advantages over the older Canon Tilt Shift lens. A no-brainer for sure!

If you own a Canon 17-40 f4 or a Canon 16-35mm f2.8 zoom lens, the Rokinon easily matches or surpasses the sharpness of these lenses especially when tilt is used to bring the entire subject plane into focus and an aperture of f8 to f11 is used for the shooting aperture. For me, as a landscape photographer, if I had to make a choice between either of the two wide angle Canon zooms or the Rokinon, I would take the Rokinon any day of the week (it’s just as sharp or sharper when stopped down but with all the creative advantages of a tilt shift lens). Canon’s two wide zooms are disappointing performers in my opinion especially for the price paid – but that is another story!

©Darwin Wiggett - shot with the Rokinon 24mm Tilt Shift lens at f8

©Darwin Wiggett – shot with the Rokinon 24mm Tilt Shift lens at f8

Sharpness in the foreground of the photo above - tilted to match subject plane and aperture of f8

Sharpness in the foreground of the photo above – tilted to get focus in the subject plane and shot at an aperture of f8

Sharpness in the background of the image above - tilted to match the subject plane at f8. these kinds of results can not be achieved with a wide angle zoom without focus stacking.

Sharpness in the background of the image above – tilted to match focus in the subject plane at f8. These kinds of results cannot be achieved with a wide angle zoom without focus stacking.

But can the Rokinon compare with the Canon 24mm TS-E f3.5L II? In a word — no. The Canon 24mm TS-E f3.5L II is my gold standard for sharpness in lenses. This lens continually amazes me with its sharpness throughout the aperture range; I rate the Canon lens as a 9.5 out of 10 in terms of sharpness and optical performance. The Rokinon is good but I would rate it as an 8 when used correctly and only when stopped down to f8 or f11. Check out the comparison shots below to see what I mean.

My nature lens chart for testing sharpness

My lens chart for testing sharpness 

Centre sharpness of the Rokinon (topt) and the Canon 24 mm tilt shift lens (bottom) at an aperture of f3.5. The Canon is harper; the Rokinon has a warmer colour cast

Centre sharpness of the Rokinon (topt) and the Canon 24 mm tilt shift lens (bottom) at an aperture of f3.5. The Canon is harper; the Rokinon has a warmer colour cast

Edge sharpness at f3.5 with the Rokinon (top) and the Canon (bottom) - a definite difference here!

Edge sharpness at f3.5 with the Rokinon (top) and the Canon (bottom) – a definite difference here!

At f8 the Rokinon (top) approaches the centre sharpness of the Canon lens (bottom) but the Canon lens still is slightly.

At f8 the Rokinon (top) approaches the centre sharpness of the Canon lens (bottom) but the Canon lens still is slightly sharper.

At f8 the Rokinon, the edge sharpness (top) improves drastically coming close to but not matching the Canon's edge sharpness at the same aperture (bottom).

At f8 the Rokinon, the edge sharpness (top) improves drastically coming close to but not matching the Canon’s edge sharpness at the same aperture (bottom).

Everything is relative. If you are used to and happy with the sharpness of the Canon 24-105mm f4L or the 16-35mm f2.8L then you will be thrilled with the sharpness of the Rokinon especially when stopped down to f8 or f11. At wider apertures the Rokinon is not too impressive in terms of sharpness especially at the edges of the frame.

I have been spoiled with a really great lens in the Canon 24mm TS-E f3.5L  which is tack at all apertures and from edge to edge. It’s hard for me to go to a lesser quality lens once you see just how sharp a great lens can be! the Rokinon is good but it just is not in the same league as the Canon 24mm TS-E f3.5 L II lens!

©Darwin Wiggett - Lower Waterfowl Lake, Banff National Park with the Rokinon 24mm tilt shift lens

©Darwin Wiggett – Lower Waterfowl Lake, Banff National Park with the Rokinon 24mm tilt shift lens at f8 – sharper than many wide angle zooms but not as sharp as the Canon TS-E 24mm f3.5L II lens

Conclusion
The Rokinon is great value in a lens. You get all the benefits of tilt and shift in an affordable lens that is as sharp or sharper (when used at f8 to f11) than most lenses that photographers use already. You have to put up with stopped down metering but this is not a deal breaker for an already manual lens workflow. If you are on a budget and want to get into the advantages of tilt and shift for landscape photography, then I recommend the Rokinon.

If you are planning to use a tilt shift lens as your prime dedicated landscape lens then I would recommend you save your pennies for the Canon 24mm f3.5L II lens simply because it is sharper and better built than the Rokinon. You get what you pay for with the Canon lens! I am not sure how well the Rokinon will hold up in hard constant use. The Canon lens has proven to be tough in my constant use of it in harsh environmental conditions. I would spend money on lenses over an upgrade to a camera body

If you own a Nikon camera, you have a conundrum: should you buy the Nikon 24 mm tilt shift lens and have slightly sharper images and better build than the Rokinon or invest in the Rokinon because it has independent rotation of tilt and shift which I think  is critical for landscape photography? Hmmm … a tough one to call for a Nikon shooter!

The good news is you can find used Rokinon tilt shift lenses out there for under $500 so you can dip your toes in tilt shift photography for relatively little cash giving you time to save up for the big name lenses if you decide you like tilt shift photography. Or maybe that Rokinon will meet all your needs. Like I said I have been spoiled by an exceptional lens in the Canon 24mm TS-E

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About our reviews:

We don’t get paid, get kickbacks, affiliate fees or have any personal benefit to do reviews on camera and lenses. We do it only for the benefit of our audience and to try out gear for ourselves. If you like our reviews and want to see more in the future then consider buying one of our eBooks to help support the site. To learn more about tilt shift photography sure to see our article Seven Advantages of Tilt Shift Lenses.

Thanks to Amplis Foto for lending us the Rokinon lens for testing.

©Darwin Wiggett - Rokinon 24mm lens at  f16 - shifted for panorama stitch.

©Darwin Wiggett – Rokinon 24mm lens at f16 – shifted for panorama stitch.

©Darwin Wiggett - A vertical panoram using the Rokinon 24mm lens at Mistaya Canyon in Banff National Park

©Darwin Wiggett – A vertical panorama using the Rokinon 24mm lens at Mistaya Canyon in Banff National Park.

©Darwin Wiggett - Rampart Ponds with the Rokinon 24mm tilt shift lean at f8 (tilted to focus the subject plane)

©Darwin Wiggett – Rampart Ponds with the Rokinon 24mm tilt shift lean at f8 (tilted to focus the subject plane) 

©Darwin Wiggett - Mistaya River in Banff National Park with the Rokinon 24mm tilt shift lens at f8 with shift and tilt.

©Darwin Wiggett – Mistaya River in Banff National Park with the Rokinon 24mm tilt shift lens at f8 with shift and tilt.

©Darwin Wiggett - Wilcox Pass, Jasper National PArk with the Rokinon tilt shift lens at f8 using tilt to focus the subject plane.

©Darwin Wiggett – Wilcox Pass, Jasper National Park with the Rokinon tilt shift lens at f8 using tilt to focus the subject plane. 

©Darwin Wiggett - Creative effects using tilt with the Rokinon 24mm tilt shift lens.

©Darwin Wiggett – Creative effects using tilt with the Rokinon 24mm tilt shift lens.

 

1 November

Canon 17mm Tilt-Shift Lens and Sigma 150mm f2.8 Macro Lens for sale (plus more)

I am selling two specialty lenses, both for Canon EOS cameras.

Yes, I am giving up my Canon 17mm f4L tilt-shift lens. For those of you who don’t know me well, I’m a preaching disciple of the Tilt-Shift lens because I believe they are the absolute best lenses for landscape photography – see why here.

So why am I selling this super cool, ultra-wide tilt-shift lens? Well… for practical reasons. As cool as it is to own the 17mm tilt-shift lens, I find the 24mm tilt-shift lens more in line with my creative vision and personality. I’m not really an extreme wide-angle guy. Plus Samantha and I plan to do more assignment work with people and I really should get a more practical lens like the new Canon 24-70mm f2.8 zoom for that work. So my 17mm TS-E is looking for a home. Anyone who loves landscape photography and likes the look of a super wide angle lens will love this tack sharp, crazy and  creative lens. I will miss it!

To buy this lens new in Alberta will cost you $2725.00 which includes GST. I am selling mine (in excellent condition) for $2000.00 CAN firm (includes GST for Canadian clients, all the goodies in the original box, plus our Tilt-Shift eBook on CD). This includes shipping to anywhere in Canada or the USA. Please email me at darwin@oopoomoo.com if you are interested. This lens is now sold!

©Darwin Wiggett – Yoho NP taken with the 17mm tilt-shift lens

Also I have  a new, in-the-box (only used once) Sigma AF 150mm f/2.8 EX DG HSM APO Macro OS lens for sale (Canon mount). A long telephoto macro lens is a boon to anyone who wants to get close-ups of nature subjects but have a good working distance between the lens and the subject (especially important for rattlesnakes, poisonous spiders, and angry field mice). New, this lens in Alberta is $1300 with GST. This is the latest model with optical stabilization built in for hand-held shots. I am selling mine complete with original 10-year Canadian warranty for $900 CAN firm (includes GST for Canadian clients) and includes shipping to anywhere in Canada or the US. Please email me at darwin@oopoomoo.com if you are interested. SOLD!

Sigma-150mm-F2_8-DG-APO-Macro

©Darwin Wiggett – Rust patterns taken with the Sigma 150mm macro lens

Speaking of sales, the Cochrane Camera Club is having a huge Swap and Sale of used gear on November 10, 2012 at the Cochrane Alliance Church. This event is free to participate in or to attend. If you have gear you want to sell, tables are free; you just have to book a table. And of course if you are looking to buy, come with cash! All the information you need is on this downloadable PDF. Catherine will be there staffing our oopoomoo booth where we will have lots more goodies to sell then!

And finally, a friend in Whitehorse, Yukon is selling two really great fast telephoto lenses for Canon FD mount cameras such as the A-1, AE-1, F-1, or  T90. If you have a Canon film camera laying around and want a great wildlife lens here is your chance to get prime glass for cheap!

Tamron 300mm f2.8 lens in Canon FD mount = $750.00!

Canon 500mm f4.5L lens in Canon FD mount = $1000.00!

Contact Marge at margemacleod@hotmail.com for more information.

28 February

Little Landscapes on the Prairie

To follow up on Samantha’s previous post, Mating Cars and HDR, here are some freshly processed images from the landscapes we’ll be visiting during the Badlands, Buicks and Old Buildings: The Prairie Tour. These are the kinds of agriculture landscapes we will see on this workshop that also covers an old scrapyard, a historic town, and a stunning badlands natural area. Stay tuned for more to come.

©Darwin Wiggett

Photographed using a Canon EOS-1ds Mark III and a Canon 24mm tilt-shift lens tilted into the subject plane for infinite looking focus (1/15s at f14).

©Darwin Wiggett

This image was made with a Canon EOS-1ds Mark III and a Canon 24mm tilt-shift lens tilted into the subject plane for infinite looking focus (1/30s at f11) and then two exposures were made: one with the lens shifted down for the foreground and a second exposure shifted up for the sky. The two shifted images were stitched together using photo merge in Photoshop CS 5.0. To learn more on shifting and tilting be sure to come to our talk on March 10, 2012 on The Tilt-Shift Lens Advantage for Nature and Outdoor Photographers.

©Darwin Wiggett

This image of a canola crop at dawn was taken using the Canon Rebel T2i and a Sigma 70-200mm lens at 137mm (2s at f16) and a Singh-Ray LB Warming Polarizer.

©Darwin Wiggett

I made this image using a Canon Rebel T2i with a Sigma 70-200mm lens at 80mm (1/5s at f11), a Singh-Ray LB Warming Polarizer and I used photo merge in Photoshop CS 5.0 to stitch the two separate images together.

As you can see, there is a huge variety of subject matter on the prairies, from wind turbines to crops to old barns. The beauty of a small workshop like this is you won’t have hordes of photographers hanging over your shoulder or crowding your view. In fact, probably no one will be up at dawn when the pale pink sky contrasts with a land just kissed by the sun. Remember that we will be learning a lot on this workshop too with topics such as Ten Tips for Photographing Prairie Landscapes, Working the Intimate Details, Creative Lens Choice, and The Art of Light Painting all on the menu! We still have a few spots left; we hope to see you there!

 

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