22 April

Announcing our Winter Discovery Photo Adventures 2015 (at Abraham Lake)

Samantha and I am pleased to partner with Aurum Lodge in January and February of next year (2015) to offer two, small-group Winter Discovery Photo Adventures at Abraham Lake in the Kootenay Plains of the Canadian Rockies. We’ll spend extensive time in the field photographing the incredible beauty of this unspoiled region. From the iconic methane bubbles trapped in the ice of Abraham Lake to the rugged peaks towering over the quiet winter highways of Canada’s world-famous mountain parks (Banff and Jasper), there’s so much to photograph and share!

We’ve tramped around photographing this area for years and we love it so much we literally wrote the book on the area! No matter what the weather or conditions, there’s a variety of locations to challenge all creative photographers, and a few additional assignments here and there provide creative support for those interested in firing up their artistic muse. The small group size of 4 to 7 participants is a rare thing on photo workshops and tours in the Canadian Rockies, but we chose a favourable student to instructor ratio to ensure lots of elbow room at all locations and access to us for all your photography questions. Another rare thing: our packages are all-inclusive (instructor and accommodation fees including all meals, beverages and room tax) so there’s no hidden or additional fees when you get here. For those looking to extend their learning experience, NEW this year is the opportunity to book private, one-on-one instructional outings before or after the Photo Adventure at a special discounted price! Join us! Discover your own vision of the magic of winter in Canadian Rockies. Click here to learn more.

Raven, Jasper National Park, Alberta, Canada

©Darwin Wiggett

SAM4006

©Samantha Chrysanthou

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

©Samantha Chrysanthou

©Samantha Chrysanthou

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

©Samantha Chrysanthou

©Samantha Chrysanthou

©Samantha Chrysanthou

©Samantha Chrysanthou

©Samantha Chrysanthou

©Samantha Chrysanthou

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

©Samantha Chrysanthou

©Samantha Chrysanthou

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

 

14 April

Clean the Clutter – The Longer the Wait, the Easier the Edit

Samantha and I have spoken many times about being ruthless in editing your work. Keep only the good stuff, toss the rest. Easier said than done though!

Of course, the longer you wait to edit your images, the more likely you’ll be objective and really clean the clutter. I finally got around to editing and processing my images from The Glory of Autumn in the Canadian Rockies Workshop held in, wait for it… 2011! So after two and a half years of sitting on the hard drive it was easy to look at the images objectively. Of the 500 photos I took, most of them seemed pretty pedestrian. I narrowed the selects down to about 50 images with ‘potential’ and in the end kept only 25 photos. I wonder if I waited another 2 years if I would keep any at all! Hmmmm… I just found several folders of images from the fall of 2005, the more time passes, the more ruthless I get.

Below are the 16 images I liked the best from the 2011 workshop. It remains to be seen if any of these images make it to my top 100 list over time. It will be interesting to see if I have anything at all to share from the 2005 trip!

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©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett - oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett

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©Darwin Wiggett

Abraham Lake, Kootenay Plains, Alberta, Canada ©Darwin Wiggett - oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett

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©Darwin Wiggett

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©Darwin Wiggett

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©Darwin Wiggett

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©Darwin Wiggett

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©Darwin Wiggett

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©Darwin Wiggett

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©Darwin Wiggett

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©Darwin Wiggett

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©Darwin Wiggett

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©Darwin Wiggett

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©Darwin Wiggett

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©Darwin Wiggett  

20 February

Results from Bubbles and Lace – Winter in the Canadian Rockies Photo Workshop 2014

Well, they did it! This year’s winter workshop was a record breaker: coldest sustained temperatures (dipping below -30C a few times), most international crew with photographers traveling from as far away as Saudi Arabia and Spain and, ironically, the most crystal clear skies with lots of sun for most of the week. But the shooters soldiered on, working the bubbles on Abraham Lake (where they weren’t hidden under the snow) but in the end, coming away with incredible images revealing their unique creative vision. We asked the students at the beginning of the workshop to think of the ‘why’ question: why do you take pictures? What in a particular scene inspires you to snap the shutter? Then we peppered them with tough assignments (to take their minds off the cold, of course!) which they completed with aplomb.

We may head out for the bubbles on Abraham Lake, but it’s the glory of the Kootenay Plains region — perhaps because of the sunny, -30C weather — that inspired the following images from the group. Great work guys, and so glad you survived!

Join the discussion! Check out the oopoomoo workshop page on Facebook.

Nicki Pesik

©Nicki Pesik

©Nicki Pesik

Dominic Byrne

©Dominic Bryne

©Dominic Byrne

Fred Dunn

©Fred Dunn

©Fred Dunn

Gro Lagesen

©Gro Lagesen

©Gro Lagesen

Rosana Ramos

©Rosana Ramos

©Rosana Ramos

 

 

 

3 February

Celebrating 10 Years of Photo Tours and Workshops in the Canadian Rockies

Samantha and I realized that 2013 marked the tenth year for our photo tours and workshops in the Canadian Rockies! Time for a wee celebration!

So as we embark on Bubbles and Lace 2014, we leave you with this short video.  And we remind you that spaces are filling in our remaining Canadian Rockies 2014 dates. Spots are limited to ensure everyone has access to instruction and the amazing scenery; we are based out of a fantastic eco-lodge in the heart of the stunning scenery in the Canadian Rockies. We hope to meet you soon at a mountain near us ;-)

 

3 January

50 at 50 Project – Choices, Choices, Choices… and Lessons from Over 25 years of Photography

Samantha and I have been busy making final image selections and doing the stories behind the images so we can launch the 50 at 50 eBook in a few weeks. Stay tuned for that.

I got my start in ‘serious’ photography when I joined Images Alberta Camera Club in Edmonton in 1986. That club was dynamic and had many instructional outings and workshops and I learned a lot from the dedicated members. At the time I was a member, I was honoured to learn from such luminaries as Daryl Benson, Mark and Leslie Degner, and Larry Louie. I thank Images CC for being such a huge influence on my work; I can see that influence reflected over the years in my imagery.

Below are some outtakes that won’t make it into the 50 at 50 eBook but that I thought might be fun to share for the lessons learned from making the photos.

1989 – Spruce trees emerging from fog at Victoria Glacier, Banff National Park

Lesson: This image taught me that telephoto lenses are great for making ‘extractive’ landscape photos that emphasize graphic compositions. I learned that a 300mm lens was a very useful focal length to make compelling landscape photos. As a side note, this image was made with a camera that I absolutely loved and for which I saved many pennies over a long time — the Canon T90. Never before and never after have I had a love affair with a piece of camera gear such as I had with the T90. The photo was made using a Canon 300mm f5.6 FD lens and Fujichome Velvia 50 slide film.

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

1996 – Canoe on George Lake, Killarney Provincial Park, Ontario

Lesson: If you can imagine it, you can make it happen. I envisioned a shot of a canoe on the rocky shore of a lake in Ontario. I traveled across Canada for nine months in 1996 to photograph for my book Darwin Wiggett Photographs Canada. I didn’t have a quintessential image of Ontario for the book so I set out to Killarney to make it happen. I rented a canoe one afternoon and scouted with my compass the shore of George Lake for a perfect location to line up with sunrise. I found one about a 30 minutes’ paddle from my campsite. I convinced the rental company with a $50 bill to let me keep the canoe overnight, and early the next morning I paddled to the spot chosen and made two images both of which have become best sellers for me. This one was an IKEA poster for many years. The other photo appears in the 50 at 50 eBook. The image was shot on a Mamiya 645 Pro camera with a 35mm lens and Fujichrome Velvia 50 slide film and a grad filter.

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

2002 – Cowgirl at Wilcox Pass, Jasper National Park

Lesson: Photoshop makes anything possible, but you gotta tell people when things are not real! In the transition days while I was still shooting film and waiting for digital cameras to become a contender in terms of quality to my medium format camera, I did a lot of Photoshop composite work in the digital darkroom. I would scan my slides into digital format and then mess with them in the computer making scenes that did not exist except in my imagination. In this image I took a cowgirl and her horse from a shot I did in British Columbia and put her into Wilcox Pass in Jasper National Park (where horses are not allowed, by the way).  After people viewed the image and found out it was a composite, they often felt really betrayed. So after that, any time I posted one of my composite images I made mention of the fact. I used to mark composite images on the thumbnails on my website so people could decide if they wanted to view ‘fake’ images or not. No one really seems to care much any more if an image is real or not especially since most photos out there today look fanciful with all the digital darkroom work done to them. Even so it is still important to let people know about composite images so they can decide the value of the image to them as viewers. Samantha and I talk about this idea of ‘how far is too far in post processing’ in a recent podcast interview over at Photography.ca

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

2010 – Abraham Lake, Kootenay Plains, Alberta

Lesson: Everyone wants big light and colourful sunrises and sunsets but dreary grey days at dusk and dawn make really great moody images. As a side note, it seems that good old Abraham Lake has become an iconic destination for photographers looking for frozen methane bubbles. The lake in winter is dangerous at the best of times but this year the lake is especially treacherous not only because the floods in June have carved out new river channels and eroded shores but also because there have been several cold spells followed by warm chinooks that have caused a cycle of freeze and thaw that makes the shoreline ice (where the bubbles are) fragile. As well, numerous snowfalls have put piles of snow along the shoreline ice seams hiding the weak ice. We do not recommend wandering around Abraham Lake without a guide or photo buddy at any time, but we especially warn against the lake this year. While we do have an eGuide on the area, including some spots where bubbles have appeared in the past, the lake has changed a lot this year so we recommend that those shooters unfamiliar with photographing on ice stay on the gravel shoreline where it is safer. If you feel you have enough experience and do decide to go on the ice, only go where the ice is absolutely clear and you can see the thickness of the ice you are walking on (6 or more inches is recommended by some guidebooks). Absolutely stay off the snow-covered, sloping shoreline and any foggy, milky or fragile ice. Crampons or icewalkers are also a must – see my guide to winter shooting to learn more about winter gear.

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

I’ll have some more stories about my favourite images made over my 25+ year career in the eBook, but for now, here’s a blast from the past: a group photo of my fellow field researchers during grad school!

Darwin in the mid 1980's _ the naked blonde dude (with hair!) on the far left of the photo.

Darwin in the mid 1980’s – the mostly naked blonde dude (with hair!) on the far left of the photo.

28 November

Fire and Ice 2013 – Participant’s Photos

One of our favorite workshops is the Fire and Ice in the Canadian Rockies which is held in early November of each year. We love the transition season of fall giving way to winter when the lakes and rivers are fringed with ice and the low sun fires up the sky. Peppered with snow, wildlife, icicles, and big light the Fire and Ice Workshop continually surprises us each year. Below are two favorite photos from each of our intrepid participants.

Jeff Maltzman

©Jeff Maltzman

©Jeff Maltzman

©Jeff Maltzman

©Jeff Maltzman

Wessel Kriel

©Wessel Kriel

©Wessel Kriel

©Wessel Kriel

©Wessel Kriel

Johann Van Der Merwe

©Johann Van Der Merwe

©Johann Van Der Merwe

©Johann Van Der Merwe

©Johann Van Der Merwe 

Lisa Couldwell

©Lisa Couldwell

©Lisa Couldwell

©Lisa Couldwell

©Lisa Couldwell

Michael Blanchette

©Michael Blanchette

©Michael Blanchette

©Michael Blanchette

©Michael Blanchette

Rick Robinson

©Rick Robinson

©Rick Robinson

©Rick Robinson

©Rick Robinson

Sonia Wadsworth

©Sonia Wadsworth

©Sonia Wadsworth

©Sonia Wadsworth

©Sonia Wadsworth

Jeffrey Wu

©Jeffrey Wu

©Jeffrey Wu

©Jeffrey Wu

©Jeffrey Wu

And here are a couple of photos from Alan Ernst of Aurum Lodge showing the photographers at work.

©Alan Ernst

©Alan Ernst

©Alan Ernst

©Alan Ernst

15 November

Real Life Review – The Rokinon 24mm f3.5 Tilt Shift Lens – A Budget Lens with Big Performance?

Anyone who follows our work knows that Sam and I are crazy for the creative advantages of Tilt Shift lenses for our nature and landscape photography. We are not crazy for the price we have to pay for these specialty lenses though. The Nikon 24mm lens sells for $2200 while the Canon 24mm lens sells for about $2400. Ouch!

Enter the Rokinon/Samyang lens squeezing in at under $900 (street value) and we have a serious alternative to consider. But do you get what you pay for? Is the Rokinon a lesser version of the Nikon and Canon both of which are top drawer lenses in terms of quality? I took the Rokinon out for an oopoomoo Real Life Review during a 4-day trip to the Canadian Rockies. Read below to find out my thoughts on this lens.

The Rokinon 24mm Tilt shift lens - Great value but at what cost?

The Rokinon 24mm tilt shift lens – great value but at what cost?

Initial Impressions
Taking the lens out of the box, I really was surprised by how light and ‘plastic-y’ the lens felt. I am used to the heavy and robust Canon Tilt Shift 24mm f3.5 L II lens which is built like a tank. The Rokinon felt like a plastic toy in comparison.  I was also not impressed by the small tilt and shift knobs. I find the Canon knobs too small and the Rokinon knobs were much smaller than Canon’s! Not great for a working photographer from cold Canada where gloves are survival tools not shooting accessories! The version of the lens I received had small, grey post-like controls for tilt and shift and locking of these movements. Apparently newer versions of the lens have larger knobs (as shown above).

The one thing that did impress me a lot was the fact that the Rokinon lens has independent tilt and shift rotation which is totally cool. The Canon 17 and 24mm tilt shift (version II) lenses also have independent rotation of tilt and shift and I can’t stress enough how much I love and use that feature. The major drawback of Nikon’s suite of tilt shift lenses (and Canon’s older tilt shift lenses) is that the shift and tilt rotation are fixed to one another and this limits the creative effects you can do with these lenses.  Kudos to Rokinon for adding this much needed feature to their budget priced lens. Also kudos to Rokinon for making a lens with a big image circle that has the same degree of tilt and shift capabilities as the Canon 24mm tilt shift lens. Awesome!

©Darwin Wiggett - Here I used tilt to bring the entire subject plane into focus and shift to make a megapixel square image. In this case the shift and tilt on the Rokinon were in the same orientation.

©Darwin Wiggett – Here I used tilt to bring the entire subject plane into focus and shift to make a megapixel square image. In this case the shift and tilt on the Rokinon were in the same orientation.

In the Field with the Rokinon
One of the reasons the Rokinon is a less expensive lens than either the Canon or Nikon tilt shift lenses is that it has a manual aperture ring that is not coupled electronically with the camera body. What this means in practice is that you need to open the lens to f3.5 to do precise focus and tilt movements and then stop the aperture down to the shooting aperture you desire. With a Canon camera and a Canon tilt shift lens, you can set your aperture in advance to whatever aperture you desire. The camera viewfinder or Live View always shows you the view at widest aperture number (e.g. f3.5) making precise focus easy. Simply get focus and shoot no matter what aperture you choose to use in the end. With the Rokinon the process is two step: focus and tilt at f3.5 and then stop down to your shooting aperture and adjust your shutter speed in manual to get proper exposure.

I didn’t mind the extra step in workflow, but what I did mind was the design of the aperture ring right up against the focus ring. Often when I turned the aperture ring to the aperture I wanted to use (mostly f8), I accidentally also moved the focus ring! Drove me crazy! You have to be really careful when turning the aperture ring or else you will nudge the focus and ruin your precisely tilted and focused image.

The aperture ring on the Rokinon is thin and butted up against the focus ring. Even if you have small fingers chances are good you might nudge focus when adjusting aperture.

The aperture ring on the Rokinon is thin and butted up against the focus ring. Even if you have small fingers chances are good you might nudge focus when adjusting aperture.

But is it Sharp?
I can live with a slightly slower workflow, and having to be extra careful with the aperture and focus ring… but if the lens is not sharp what’s the point? OK , so what the verdict?

Well.. the Rokinon is definitely as sharp or sharper than the older Canon 24mm TS-E version I plus it has independent tilt and shift rotation and a bigger image circle and more degrees of tilt and shift. A used Canon 24mm TS-E version I costs about $900. For the same price you could have the Rokinon new and gain many creative advantages over the older Canon Tilt Shift lens. A no-brainer for sure!

If you own a Canon 17-40 f4 or a Canon 16-35mm f2.8 zoom lens, the Rokinon easily matches or surpasses the sharpness of these lenses especially when tilt is used to bring the entire subject plane into focus and an aperture of f8 to f11 is used for the shooting aperture. For me, as a landscape photographer, if I had to make a choice between either of the two wide angle Canon zooms or the Rokinon, I would take the Rokinon any day of the week (it’s just as sharp or sharper when stopped down but with all the creative advantages of a tilt shift lens). Canon’s two wide zooms are disappointing performers in my opinion especially for the price paid – but that is another story!

©Darwin Wiggett - shot with the Rokinon 24mm Tilt Shift lens at f8

©Darwin Wiggett – shot with the Rokinon 24mm Tilt Shift lens at f8

Sharpness in the foreground of the photo above - tilted to match subject plane and aperture of f8

Sharpness in the foreground of the photo above – tilted to get focus in the subject plane and shot at an aperture of f8

Sharpness in the background of the image above - tilted to match the subject plane at f8. these kinds of results can not be achieved with a wide angle zoom without focus stacking.

Sharpness in the background of the image above – tilted to match focus in the subject plane at f8. These kinds of results cannot be achieved with a wide angle zoom without focus stacking.

But can the Rokinon compare with the Canon 24mm TS-E f3.5L II? In a word — no. The Canon 24mm TS-E f3.5L II is my gold standard for sharpness in lenses. This lens continually amazes me with its sharpness throughout the aperture range; I rate the Canon lens as a 9.5 out of 10 in terms of sharpness and optical performance. The Rokinon is good but I would rate it as an 8 when used correctly and only when stopped down to f8 or f11. Check out the comparison shots below to see what I mean.

My nature lens chart for testing sharpness

My lens chart for testing sharpness 

Centre sharpness of the Rokinon (topt) and the Canon 24 mm tilt shift lens (bottom) at an aperture of f3.5. The Canon is harper; the Rokinon has a warmer colour cast

Centre sharpness of the Rokinon (topt) and the Canon 24 mm tilt shift lens (bottom) at an aperture of f3.5. The Canon is harper; the Rokinon has a warmer colour cast

Edge sharpness at f3.5 with the Rokinon (top) and the Canon (bottom) - a definite difference here!

Edge sharpness at f3.5 with the Rokinon (top) and the Canon (bottom) – a definite difference here!

At f8 the Rokinon (top) approaches the centre sharpness of the Canon lens (bottom) but the Canon lens still is slightly.

At f8 the Rokinon (top) approaches the centre sharpness of the Canon lens (bottom) but the Canon lens still is slightly sharper.

At f8 the Rokinon, the edge sharpness (top) improves drastically coming close to but not matching the Canon's edge sharpness at the same aperture (bottom).

At f8 the Rokinon, the edge sharpness (top) improves drastically coming close to but not matching the Canon’s edge sharpness at the same aperture (bottom).

Everything is relative. If you are used to and happy with the sharpness of the Canon 24-105mm f4L or the 16-35mm f2.8L then you will be thrilled with the sharpness of the Rokinon especially when stopped down to f8 or f11. At wider apertures the Rokinon is not too impressive in terms of sharpness especially at the edges of the frame.

I have been spoiled with a really great lens in the Canon 24mm TS-E f3.5L  which is tack at all apertures and from edge to edge. It’s hard for me to go to a lesser quality lens once you see just how sharp a great lens can be! the Rokinon is good but it just is not in the same league as the Canon 24mm TS-E f3.5 L II lens!

©Darwin Wiggett - Lower Waterfowl Lake, Banff National Park with the Rokinon 24mm tilt shift lens

©Darwin Wiggett – Lower Waterfowl Lake, Banff National Park with the Rokinon 24mm tilt shift lens at f8 – sharper than many wide angle zooms but not as sharp as the Canon TS-E 24mm f3.5L II lens

Conclusion
The Rokinon is great value in a lens. You get all the benefits of tilt and shift in an affordable lens that is as sharp or sharper (when used at f8 to f11) than most lenses that photographers use already. You have to put up with stopped down metering but this is not a deal breaker for an already manual lens workflow. If you are on a budget and want to get into the advantages of tilt and shift for landscape photography, then I recommend the Rokinon.

If you are planning to use a tilt shift lens as your prime dedicated landscape lens then I would recommend you save your pennies for the Canon 24mm f3.5L II lens simply because it is sharper and better built than the Rokinon. You get what you pay for with the Canon lens! I am not sure how well the Rokinon will hold up in hard constant use. The Canon lens has proven to be tough in my constant use of it in harsh environmental conditions. I would spend money on lenses over an upgrade to a camera body

If you own a Nikon camera, you have a conundrum: should you buy the Nikon 24 mm tilt shift lens and have slightly sharper images and better build than the Rokinon or invest in the Rokinon because it has independent rotation of tilt and shift which I think  is critical for landscape photography? Hmmm … a tough one to call for a Nikon shooter!

The good news is you can find used Rokinon tilt shift lenses out there for under $500 so you can dip your toes in tilt shift photography for relatively little cash giving you time to save up for the big name lenses if you decide you like tilt shift photography. Or maybe that Rokinon will meet all your needs. Like I said I have been spoiled by an exceptional lens in the Canon 24mm TS-E

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About our reviews:

We don’t get paid, get kickbacks, affiliate fees or have any personal benefit to do reviews on camera and lenses. We do it only for the benefit of our audience and to try out gear for ourselves. If you like our reviews and want to see more in the future then consider buying one of our eBooks to help support the site. To learn more about tilt shift photography sure to see our article Seven Advantages of Tilt Shift Lenses.

Thanks to Amplis Foto for lending us the Rokinon lens for testing.

©Darwin Wiggett - Rokinon 24mm lens at  f16 - shifted for panorama stitch.

©Darwin Wiggett – Rokinon 24mm lens at f16 – shifted for panorama stitch.

©Darwin Wiggett - A vertical panoram using the Rokinon 24mm lens at Mistaya Canyon in Banff National Park

©Darwin Wiggett – A vertical panorama using the Rokinon 24mm lens at Mistaya Canyon in Banff National Park.

©Darwin Wiggett - Rampart Ponds with the Rokinon 24mm tilt shift lean at f8 (tilted to focus the subject plane)

©Darwin Wiggett – Rampart Ponds with the Rokinon 24mm tilt shift lean at f8 (tilted to focus the subject plane) 

©Darwin Wiggett - Mistaya River in Banff National Park with the Rokinon 24mm tilt shift lens at f8 with shift and tilt.

©Darwin Wiggett – Mistaya River in Banff National Park with the Rokinon 24mm tilt shift lens at f8 with shift and tilt.

©Darwin Wiggett - Wilcox Pass, Jasper National PArk with the Rokinon tilt shift lens at f8 using tilt to focus the subject plane.

©Darwin Wiggett – Wilcox Pass, Jasper National Park with the Rokinon tilt shift lens at f8 using tilt to focus the subject plane. 

©Darwin Wiggett - Creative effects using tilt with the Rokinon 24mm tilt shift lens.

©Darwin Wiggett – Creative effects using tilt with the Rokinon 24mm tilt shift lens.

 

18 October

The Glory of Autumn in the Canadian Rockies 2013 Results

Below are the results of this year’s Glory of Autumn in the Canadian Rockies photo tour. I must say this was one crazy and zany group and I never hurt so much from laughing! Thanks to all who came and made this a memorable adventure (the group photo is at the end).

For anyone interested in next year’s event we are already halfway full and it will be an intense learning and creative experience with our new workshop format and the addition of Samantha as a co-instructor. Looking forward to it!

Marion Faria

©Marion Faria

©Marion Faria

©Marion Faria

©Marion Faria

Allison George

©Allison George

©Allison George

©Allison George

©Allison George

Ian Reid

©Iain Reid

©Iain Reid

©Iain Reid

©Iain Reid

Natalya Pluzhnikov

©Natalya Pluzhnikov

©Natalya Pluzhnikov

©Natalya Pluzhnikov

©Natalya Pluzhnikov

Daniel Benn

©Daniel Benn

©Daniel Benn

©Daniel Benn

©Daniel Benn

Gro Lagensen

©Gro Lagensen

©Gro Lagensen

©Gro Lagensen

©Gro Lagensen

Tim Collins

 

©Tim Collins

©Tim Collins

©Tim Collins

©Tim Collins

The Crew along with Alan and Madeleine of Aurum Lodge

©Allison George

©Allison George

23 September

Off to Photograph the Glory of Autumn in the Canadian Rockies

I am headed out to the Canadian Rockies for a week of photographing wonderful scenery and hanging out with terrific people! Every autumn, for almost a decade, I’ve run a photo tour in the Rockies, guiding participants to the best locations given the light and weather. We’re still going to be your guides in 2014, but Glory of Autumn in the Canadian Rockies will be much more than just a trophy tour. Based on feedback we’ve had from many participants, we’ve altered the format of this event to that of a workshop — essentially, you will be getting more out of your experience in the future! So what’s new? Structured lessons on key topics, tailored assignments so you can benchmark your progress and the benefit of in-class critique are all combined with lots of field time, making these workshops unique in the area. Plus, I have a secret reason why I’m excited about these changes…Samantha is joining me in co-leading these workshops! You get the benefit of two instructors, and I get the company of my sweety. To see why we’re both pretty stoked about the Glory of Autumn workshops, check out the schedule here.

Until we meet one fall day in the glorious Canadian Rockies, we’ll leave you with a few helpful articles for creating great images no matter where you live.

How to Create Great Nature Photos No Matter Where You Live

Copying Versus Repetition: Why One is Boring and the Other is Essential

Ten Timeless (and Maybe Unorthodox) Tips for Better Photographs

Easy Techniques for Dripping Fall Colours

Why Every Landscape Photographer Should be Using Filters – Still!

Telephoto Lenses for High Impact Landscape Photography

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

©Samantha Chrysanthou

©Samantha Chrysanthou 

20 September

Our 5-Night Tonquin Valley Hike without Cameras – Any Regrets?

As some of you know Samantha and I headed out in late August on a 5-night backpack trip to Tonquin Valley in Jasper National Park without any cameras at all. For those not familiar with the Tonquin it is easily one of the most stunning backcountry destinations in the Canadian Rockies. Not taking a camera would seem to some equivalent to not taking photos at your wedding.

So some of you emailed or asked us in person, “do you have any regrets?”  Below  are our answers:

Darwin

I have not been to Tonquin Valley in over 10 years and we had planned a fairly leisurely circuit of 6 days and 5 nights so there would have been plenty of opportunity for photography. But I also know from past experience that sometimes the camera gets in the way of experiencing nature on a deeper level. The camera can be a distraction putting a barrier between you and your surroundings or colouring how you see your surroundings through pre-conceived notions of what is ‘valuable’ to photograph. The good thing about years of photography is that it taught me how to see, how to enjoy the subtleties of light and design in nature. For this trip I actually ‘saw’ way more than if I had a camera. I felt like an elite athlete in the zone. I had no camera to interrupt my visual flow. I came away with new ideas and approaches to try in my photography the next time I pick up a camera. The trip primed my creative pump and got me really excited to move forward with new projects and ideas. I am a better artist for having left the camera behind.

And even more importantly than this fresh injection of seeing, I value the trip more because of the deep connections Samantha and I made during the trip. No cameras were there to take us into our own little private worlds. We actually spent time in conversation rather than running around chasing light.  The trip not only helped me grow as an artist, it  grew our relationship. What could be better? No regrets at all – we should do this more often!

Samantha

 I wasn’t as apprehensive as Darwin about setting out without a camera even though this was my first foray to world-famous Tonquin. In fact, I looked forward to it. This past year, we had worked really hard with numerous talks, workshops and seminars. Maybe even too hard. When you have a business in the photo industry, instead of a passion for photography as a hobby, your creative side can suffer sometimes. I felt like I needed to take a step back and reconnect with nature and myself. Because we teach photography for a living, there would have been a host of other expectations and needs if I took my camera along…for example, people may expect shots to be posted on this blog! Leaving the camera at home allowed me to just enjoy the hike as a vacation and to share my experience with my partner. I didn’t realize how much a camera (or any device with which we become obsessed) can get in the way of just being present with your loved ones until we left ours at home. Darwin and I were able to experience Tonquin together, like we experienced our first hikes after we started dating. Maybe there’s a lesson there…every now and then I’m going to put down the device and just spend time with people. I know I won’t have any regrets.

©Samantha Chrysanthou - self portraits on a hike where we had a camera

©Samantha Chrysanthou – self portraits on a hike where we had a camera

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