17 May

Spring and Summer Mentorships for Creative Photography

Here at oopoomoo HQ we enjoy helping people become better photographers (e.g. hone their craft) but what truly gets us excited and what we LOVE to do is help photographers become artists. We are all creatures born to create, and in photography the image is the conduit for personal expression. Channeling your vision through that conduit is easy if you know how to use your tools (the technical part of photography) AND if you are in touch with yourself, honour who you are and know what you have to say (the visionary part of photography). To help with both these aspects of photography, we are offering small group mentorships this summer designed to immerse you in the technical craft and artful expression of photography. Where will your personal vision take you?

Mastering the Creative Potential of the Tilt Shift Lens – June 18, 2017

For us, no other other tool in the camera bag offers as many technical and creative advantages as the tilt-shift lens. With a tilt-shift lens you can correct keystoning in-camera, make seamless horizontal and vertical panoramas, create giant, megapixel monster images, alter the plane of focus for incredible apparent sharpness independent of aperture, and manufacture dreamy, blurred and miniaturized-looking images.  And, best of all, every one of these techniques is created in-camera with nary a pixel altered by less capable software substitutes! The possibilities are almost endless. In the hands of an artist, a tilt-shift lens is a superhero paintbrush! To create art you still must master the brush, but once you do, your creativity will be unleashed and your photography will never be the usual ho-hum. This three-hour hands-on workshop will have you the master of the Tilt Shift lens so that you can use its potential to express your creative vision!

7/365 – The Mentored Photo Project

The Mentored Photo Project is a week of intense self-discovery through photography. With the guidance of us, your mentors, Sam and Darwin, you will conceive of, plan and execute a small photography project. A mentored photo project engages many different creative skills and is a rewarding way to transform your ideas into a guided, published reality. Several of our past mentored students have gone on to expand their projects in a way that has positively influenced their development as creative artists. Limited dates available! Register before May 31 and save 40%!

The Power of Composition and Light – May 27, 2017

This full day seminar in Medicine Hat, Alberta covers The Language of Light in Landscape Photography, Harnessing the Power of Tone for Compelling Images, Working Advanced Compositional Patterns in the Landscape, and Putting it all Together: Creative Landscape Imagery. We have a special announcement regarding this seminar…we’ve opened up a special offering of our popular online course,  Resolve: Discover your Creative Self for seminar attendees! We’re also pricing this informative and insightful course at $95 (regular price $150) to encourage everyone to participate in this unique course! See you at the seminar!

 

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3 May

oopoomoo March Photo Challenge – Emergence from Henrik Fessler

In our last blog post we showcased images on the theme Emergence (#emergence) submitted though our oopoomoo Creatives Facebook group. In this post we want to highlight an image we received via email from Henrik Fessler. We love the photo and wanted to share it here on the blog. Henrik says of the image:

Every spring I feel the urge not to miss out the bloom of things after a long gray and dull winter. After a short blossom phase of 2-3 weeks everything is switched back to “normal” spring mode. That way, I have the sense of emergency to not miss the phase of plants’ emergence phase (-;  To celebrate this magic period, here’s my submission (It’s a magnolia tree in our small city park taken at Bruchsal/Germany). On a technical note: it was taken with a 60 year old GDR lens -Carl Zeiss Jena Biotar 58mm F2-, with an APS C Camera and a cheap focal reducer … I do not want to bother with a bulky full frame camera any more (-;

©Henrik Fessler

2 May

The Results of the March 2017 oopoomoo Challenge: Emergence

For March the monthly challenge over on the oopoomoo Creatives Facebook Page was “Emergence”. Below we present our favourite submissions posted to the Facebook group. Congratulations to everyone who participated. Stay tuned for the April challenge which will be sent out shortly in the oopoomoo monthly newsletter (sign-up form in the side-bar to the right).

©Chris Baird

©Chris Bone

©Chris Greenwood

©Cindie Fearnall

©David Klautt

©Drake Dyck

©Janice Kretzer-Prysunka

©Janice Kretzer-Prysunka

©Kathy Stinson

©Michael Gay

©Monica Schimanke

©Pam Jenks

©Pam Jenks

©Phyllis Fitzsimons

©Riana Vermaak

©Riana Vermaak

©Robert Skoye

©Shooting Earth Naresh

6 April

Janice Kretzer-Prysunka: Non-iconic Images in Iconic Locations

Each month we send out a newsletter to our oopoomoo newsletter subscribers with an assignment for the month. In March, we wanted photographers to show us a non-iconic view of an iconic location. We themed the assignment #league_landscape in honour of our new publishing project League magazine (which is now open for subscriptions and submissions). There was a lot of fabulous non-iconic assignment images shown by photographers in our oopoomoo Facebook group but one photographer, Janice Kretzer-Prysunka, really stood out with her portfolio of personal takes at iconic locations. Great work Janice!

©Janice Kretzer-Prysunka – Mount Robson

©Janice Kretzer-Prysunka – Horseshoe Lake, Jasper

©Janice Kretzer-Prysunka – Medicine Lake, Jasper

©Janice Kretzer-Prysunka – Mount Rundle, Banff

©Janice Kretzer-Prysunka – Athabasca Falls, Jasper

©Janice Kretzer-Prysunka – Tangle Falls, Jasper

©Janice Kretzer-Prysunka – Three Sisters, Canmore

9 March

Announcing…The League of Landscape Photographers!

We’re excited to share with you something we’ve been working on for awhile now. Introducing the League of Landscape Photographers! It’s a new community of like-minded photographers drawn together by similar interests, beliefs and values such as:

  • the belief that photography is an art form not a craft, and that photographers are artists and not mere technicians
  • a passion for the workings and integrity of the natural world which is expressed not only through artful, mindful photography projects, but also adherence to a personal code of ethics
  • the belief that photography should be valued at the same level as other arts when it achieves high quality expression – photographers should be paid for their work

It’s too easy to look around the world and only see destruction and displacement. It’s much harder to focus on all the positive efforts that are being made to counter and contain some of the huge problems of the day. It’s too easy to engage in trophy travel in pursuit of social media ‘likes’. It’s much harder to turn your lens toward capturing changes happening in your own backyard. And it’s too easy to throw up your hands, shrug helplessly, and declare nothing will ever change when photographers, especially landscape and nature photographers are out there on the land, cameras in hand…making a difference with their art!

What the League is Not

The League of Landscape Photographers is a bit different from other groups.

The League is not a charity, society or non-profit but a grassroots, self-identified, loose collection of people who have posted their own code of ethics or value statement about how they conduct themselves. To join, you post to the world your own code of ethics and a statement that you are a member of the League of Landscape Photographers. That’s it. There’s no gate-keeping based on your level of photography skills. There is no one collecting fees from you to join. You are a League member when you act like a League member.

The League is not a conservation group. Political agendas of all stripes have pushed public discourse into simplistic, zero-sum debates. The world is not black and white – it’s full of colour. Similarly, while League photographers may engage with environmental issues, they do so to challenge attitudes and push assumptions not provide either/or documentaries or knee-jerk reactions. The League of Landscape Photographers is a group of artists who use their art as a window into their personal landscape.

The League is not a calendar publishing company. One thing landscape and nature shooters have done well is bring to us stunning photos of the most glorious, enchanting and pure places on earth. The internet is crammed full of beautiful images with scenes apparently untouched by man. It’s gotten to the point where such images are almost dismissed, and the pursuit is on for the next best ‘wow’ image. But how helpful is this parade? League of Landscape Photographers dig deeper by directly addressing how humanity intersects and connects with the landscape. Instead of sanitized scenes devoid of reality, League members open their hearts to the realities in their communities and share with the world what their eyes are seeing.

It’s a Movement

We believe photographers, and especially nature and landscape photographers, are uniquely placed as artists to add thoughtful dialogue about contemporary woes. But they need a reputable platform for their work. Enter Part II of this announcement…we will be crowdfunding this spring to publish a high quality, art magazine featuring photography portfolios and projects of League members. This is it! This is the Big One for League members! Simply called League, this annual will be the vehicle of expression for many aspiring artists who have something to say about the world with their photography.

League magazine cover

A potential cover…

Learn More

  • Visit the League of Landscape Photographer’s website to learn more about the League, League magazine and for ideas on creating your own code of ethics.
  • Post your code of ethics and join the League! Then get involved in the community by joining the League Facebook group or sharing on Instagram.
  • Attend one of the upcoming events to help fundraise for League – or organize your own and donate to the campaign.
  • Tell your friends! While not everyone is a photographer, we all love art. Be a patron of the arts by donating to the campaign. You can read more about the cost of publishing a magazine here. Join the League Newsletter for news and announcements – like the date sales open for League! Only a limited number of copies will be printed of the inaugural issue…make sure you get yours.

The League logo




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31 January

The Best of oopoomoo Creatives 2016

We are thrilled to showcase the best work of our oopoomoo Creatives Facebook group. This group of our students, friends and colleagues have produced creative and thoughtful work over the course of 2016. We are proud of their creative vision… most of the pictures were not taken at far off places or in iconic locations but rather were taken locally of everyday scenes. These 70 images confirm that it’s vision and individual expression that pushes art and not technique, gear or even location. Whether it’s the sweep of curtains across a carpeted floor or blades of grass in a sidewalk crack there is art everywhere if we are open to seeing. We want to thank all the oopoomoo Creatives out there for your continued inspiration and passion. Your great work deserved to be seen and we plan to provide even more opportunities to share your images with the world – stay tuned!

©Al Dixon

©Al Dixon

©Andrew Barron

©Andrew Barron

©Anita Vermaak

©Anita Vermaak

©Ann Nickerson

©Ann Nickerson

©Anna Ferree

©Anna Ferree

©April Henrikson Daly

©April Henrikson Daly

©Bill Warmington

©Bill Warmington

©Bill Warmington

©Bill Warmington

©Brian Hayward

©Brian Hayward

©Carol James

©Carol James

©Carol James

©Carol James

©Carolyn Steingard

©Carolyn Steingard

©Cheryl Wallach

©Cheryl Wallach

©Chris Baird

©Chris Baird

©Chris Baird

©Chris Baird

©Chris Bone

©Chris Bone

©Chris Greenwood

©Chris Greenwood

©Chris Greenwood

©Chris Greenwood

©Chris Hayward

©Chris Hayward

©Christian Van Schepen

©Christian Van Schepen

©Connie Quinton

©Connie Quinton

©Connie Quinton

©Connie Quinton

©Dave Benson

©Dave Benson

©Dave Williamson

©Dave Williamson

©Dave Williamson

©Dave Williamson

©Dave Williamson

©Dave Williamson

©Dominic Byrne

©Dominic Byrne

©Dominic Byrne

©Donna Caplinger

©Donna Caplinger

©Drake Dyck

©Drake Dyck

©Drake Dyck

©Drake Dyck

©Edwina Podemski

©Edwina Podemski

©Elaine Delichte O'Keefe

©Elaine Delichte O’Keefe

©Fran Gallogly

©Fran Gallogly

©Fran Gallogly

©Fran Gallogly

©Frank Schortinghus

©Frank Schortinghus

©George Clayton

©George Clayton

©George Clayton

©George Clayton

©Gerry Ambury

©Gerry Ambury

©Gord Campbell

©Gord Campbell

©Hank Broomfield

©Hank Broomfield

©Heather Donauer

©Heather Donauer

©Huw Jenkins

©Huw Jenkins

©Jane Chesebrough

©Jane Chesebrough

©Janelle Evans

©Janelle Evans

©Janice Kretzer-Prysunka

©Janice Kretzer-Prysunka

©Janet Barclay

©Janet Barclay

©John Foehl

©John Foehl

©Kat Enns

©Kat Enns

©Kathy Stinson

©Kathy Stinson

©Keith Walker

©Keith Walker

©Kelly Kitsch

©Kelly Kitsch

©Kristin Duff

©Kristin Duff

©Liz Forrester

©Liz Forrester

©Liz Forrester

©Liz Forrester

©Lorraine McNeely

©Lorraine McNeely

©Lynn Smith

©Lynn Smith

©Lynn Smith

©Lynn Smith

©Pam Jenks

©Pam Jenks

©Philip Cote

©Philip Cote

©Priya Biswas Miller

©Priya Biswas Miller

©Ralph Croning

©Ralph Croning

©Riana Vermaak

©Riana Vermaak

©Ryan Crouse

©Ryan Crouse

©Shaun Conarroe

©Shaun Conarroe

©Steve Poole

©Steve Poole

©Sue Olmstead

©Susan Olmstead

©Susan Ashley

©Susan Ashley

©Tom Nevesely

©Tom Nevesely

©Tracy Hindle

©Tracy Hindle

18 August

Project Mentorship: The Bragging Wall Part III

We love it when photographers get creative.

©Pam Jenks

©Pam Jenks

We also love making mentorships a weeny-teeny bit challenging for our students. Pam Jenks confessed at the outset of this mentorship that she loves “big, spectacular landscapes” but when in the field struggles a bit to see compelling leading lines or interesting foregrounds. Her initial idea involved layers. We liked that concept, but wanted to make things a bit more interesting…Pam’s job was not to photograph just simple layers, but to make an image where layers were paramount and the first impression…overlaid upon what on second look is straightforward, raw nature. No post-processing props, no glory light or dazzling colour (ok, a little colour)…Pam’s images required careful, objective seeing in the field and strong composition work.

Here is Pam’s project statement:

I want to create a collection of images where the viewer first notices layers (lines/rectangles) and then secondly sees what was used to create those layers.  I’ll do this by creating abstract images; the realism of the landscape or natural scene will be hidden in those layers. 

Ten of her images are below. We think she did very well, don’t you?

©Pam Jenks

©Pam Jenks

©Pam Jenks

©Pam Jenks

©Pam Jenks

©Pam Jenks

©Pam Jenks

©Pam Jenks

©Pam Jenks

©Pam Jenks

©Pam Jenks

©Pam Jenks

©Pam Jenks

©Pam Jenks

©Pam Jenks

©Pam Jenks

©Pam Jenks

©Pam Jenks

In fact, we think more photographers should delve as deeply into their subject matter as Pam did in this mentorship – Shrek and Donkey think so too – because everybody loves parfaits!

From the movie, Shrek:
Shrek: For your information, there’s a lot more to ogres than people think.
Donkey: Example?
Shrek: Example… uh… ogres are like onions!
[holds up an onion, which Donkey sniffs]
Donkey: They stink?
Shrek: Yes… No!
Donkey: Oh, they make you cry?
Shrek: No!
Donkey: Oh, you leave ’em out in the sun, they get all brown, start sproutin’ little white hairs…
Shrek: [peels an onion] NO! Layers. Onions have layers. Ogres have layers… You get it? We both have layers.
[walks off]
Donkey: Oh, you both have LAYERS. Oh. You know, not everybody like onions. CAKE! Everybody loves cake! Cakes have layers!
Shrek: I don’t care what everyone likes! Ogres are not like cakes.
Donkey: You know what ELSE everybody likes? Parfaits! Have you ever met a person, you say, “Let’s get some parfait,” they say, “Hell no, I don’t like no parfait.”? Parfaits are delicious!
Shrek: NO! You dense, irritating, miniature beast of burden! Ogres are like onions! End of story! Bye-bye! See ya later.
Donkey: Parfait’s gotta be the most delicious thing on the whole damn planet!

(Source: http://www.imdb.com/character/ch0002002/quotes)

Check out previous students Lynn and Erin’s projects for the 7/365: The Mentored Photo Project course too!

20 June

7/365 – The Mentored Photo Project

What is the value of one week of your life?

Snap300

What is the value of that week if you were doing something creative that you loved?

MR. MR-5073. 30-year old woman painting wooden bench in home.

We believe firmly in the value of self-directed projects for artistic growth. Certainly we have been busy pursuing our own this year! But as we spent more time nurturing our photographic inclinations, we kept thinking how helpful a small mentored project might be for other photographers who wanted to get a creative idea out there in the world or even looking toward exhibiting their work. As much as we love doing our photographic thing, we kept wanting to share our happiness with you!

NMP14832

So our question is, do you have a photo project in you that’s itching to get out?

Project Sample

It may not be a big project (in fact, it probably shouldn’t be). It might even be a little strange or funny or weird. But you know that feeling you get when you’re out and about, and you see something and you think, “I wonder…” What if you had the time to pursue that little idea or spark of interest? Better still, what if you had two professionals invested in seeing your idea come to light, providing goal-setting materials, helping with planning and coaching you along the way?

We get those weird inspirations too. Now, we know better than to judge them. We call them our little orphan babies – orphan because there really is no home for them in what we do as professional photographers. They aren’t going to sell a workshop or print or calendar. No photo magazine wants them. They might even be such ugly little things that people turn away from their Facebook page! But they won’t let us go, these half-formed, raw and squirming intuitions. We have to bring them to the light and find a home for them.

RelicsWhere should these little orphan ideas go? Well, what better place to try original ideas than our website, oopoomoo? Over the last year, we’ve moved our business toward a direction we find exciting; oopoomoo is more than ever a platform for sharing inspiring, talented and fresh photography, and we hope to have more stories behind living a creative life on the blog in future. We want to help you bring your orphan ideas to the world through a one-week, mentored photo project. Who knows? Maybe they’ll even find a home on the oopoomoo website through a published portfolio review!

If you have a photo project in you, then consider our new eCourse, 7/365: The Mentored Photo Project. It will take only one week of your time, but we bet you reap the rewards of seeing your project through the rest of your life. The satisfaction of bringing your unique way of seeing to the world is what every artist strives to achieve.

Resolve students! This new eCourse is a logical extension of 2016’s Resolve: Discovering Your Creative Self. You have the foundation for this next level of artistic development. To acknowledge your accomplishment, we have a special Early Bird discount for the month of July and August for all Resolve 2016 students – but space is limited! Use the appropriate monthly discount code provided to you in the June 17, 2016 Resolve Newsletter at checkout.

NMP859A

 

1 June

The Best of #CreativeClouds

Every month here at oopoomoo we send out our newsletter with a themed photography assignment. For the month of May our assignment was “Creative Clouds” open to any interpretation. We had a lot of great entries over on our oopoomoo Creatives Facebook page. Thanks everyone for your participation!

Below is a selection of our favourite images submitted. Stay tuned for our June newsletter which will be sent out in a day or two with June’s photo assignment. To sign up for our newsletter click here and get our Born Creative eBook for free.

©Barb Kreutter

©Barb Kreutter

©Brenda Hudson

©Brenda Hudson

©Christy Nielsen

©Christy Nielsen

©David Klautt

©David Klautt

©Gary Galger

©Gary Galger

©Gerry Ambury

©Gerry Ambury

©Ingrid VanderGaag

©Ingrid VanderGaag

©Ingrid VanderGaag

©Jim Harris

©John Andersen

©John Andersen

©Keith Walker

©Keith Walker

©Keith Walker

©Keith Walker

©Lynda McKay

©Lynda McKay

©Mark Jinks

©Mark Jinks

©Michelle Barclay

©Michelle Barclay

©Mike Perkins

©Mike Perkins

©Pam Jenks

©Pam Jenks

©Pam Jenks

©Pam Jenks

©Rachel Bilodeau

©Rachel Bilodeau

©Ralph A. Croning

©Ralph A. Croning

©Robert Skoye

©Robert Skoye

©Russ Smith

©Russ Smith

©Sherry Christensen

©Sherry Christensen

©Sherry Christensen

©Sherry Christensen

©Veronica Reist

©Veronica Reist

©Vicki Brown

©Vicki Brown

 

18 March

Who Are You Creatively?

This article was first published in Outdoor Photography Canada just over a year ago, to get these articles fresh from the press be sure to subscribe to the magazine!

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

Who Are you Creatively?

Why do you make photographs? Some people will answer that they make photographs because they want to document their travels or important events in their lives. Others are inspired by nature and want to capture this inspiration. And many use photography as a positive escape from the hectic rat race of life (a kind of meditation or mental yoga). But if we dig even deeper I think there is a universal desire, if not a need, for creativity. As kids we are all naturally curious and creative. Unfortunately, these traits get sapped out of us early on as we are taught the ‘values’ of practical education, work, consumption, and conformity. Many of us picked photography as a creative antidote for the homogenous pressures put on us by society.

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

But as we learn and practice photography, the ‘ought tos’ start to rear their ugly heads. We are taught about subjects we ought to photograph, locations we ought to visit, compositional rules we ought to follow. In short, over time, the very hobby we took up to express our creativity is stuffed into a box and turned into formula. We suppress our creativity and shoot just what others deem acceptable.

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

Every so often we need a reset, a reminder to get in touch with who we are and what our inner voice wants to say but that gets drowned out by the yelling of the outside world. Lately, I was feeling out of touch with my creative voice and felt that I was just repeating photographic formulas. My partner, Samantha suggested a little exercise for me to do that would help me determine who I am creatively. She showed me a variety of visual arts from painting to collage. She asked me to pick out pieces that I really liked and then had me write out answers to these questions about each piece:

  1. What do you think this picture is about?
  2. What do you respond to or find interesting in the picture? Why?
  3. Looking at the shape, line, form, texture and colour etc. used by the artist, how do these compositional and material choices help convey the essence of the picture?
©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

Together we looked at my art choices and my detailed answers to her questions. We began to notice some themes, ideas, visual elements and even colours common to each piece. Sam suggested that these commonalities were the seeds of my creative voice. Frankly, I was surprised by the results because the imagery I liked was very different than the images I have become known for. But when I looked at my most recent work, there were little hints of this new voice trying to emerge; I was already beginning to use the themes, ideas and visual design elements that I had chosen in Sam’s exercise. It became obvious that I no longer knew myself creatively. Indeed, I had changed significantly but was still trying to force myself to shoot in my old ‘style’. No wonder photography was feeling strained lately. Now that I have discovered with Sam’s help who I am as a creative, the world has opened up for me again. Photography is a playground and I have given myself permission to play once again.

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

So if you are feeling a bit lost with your photography, try Sam’s exercise and share and discuss the results with a good friend or fellow photographer. Better yet use the exercise on each other. Often someone else can see easier patterns in your choices that you may subconsciously deny or that you may not want to see. What often emerges from this exercise is the discovery of who you are as a visual creative. That is a powerful revelation. Now go discover your creative voice.

For those wanting more direction on creativity be sure to download our free Born Creative eBook or better yet get our 5 eBook Creative Photography Bundle! Happy shooting!

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

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