31 January

The Best of oopoomoo Creatives 2016

We are thrilled to showcase the best work of our oopoomoo Creatives Facebook group. This group of our students, friends and colleagues have produced creative and thoughtful work over the course of 2016. We are proud of their creative vision… most of the pictures were not taken at far off places or in iconic locations but rather were taken locally of everyday scenes. These 70 images confirm that it’s vision and individual expression that pushes art and not technique, gear or even location. Whether it’s the sweep of curtains across a carpeted floor or blades of grass in a sidewalk crack there is art everywhere if we are open to seeing. We want to thank all the oopoomoo Creatives out there for your continued inspiration and passion. Your great work deserved to be seen and we plan to provide even more opportunities to share your images with the world – stay tuned!

©Al Dixon

©Al Dixon

©Andrew Barron

©Andrew Barron

©Anita Vermaak

©Anita Vermaak

©Ann Nickerson

©Ann Nickerson

©Anna Ferree

©Anna Ferree

©April Henrikson Daly

©April Henrikson Daly

©Bill Warmington

©Bill Warmington

©Bill Warmington

©Bill Warmington

©Brian Hayward

©Brian Hayward

©Carol James

©Carol James

©Carol James

©Carol James

©Carolyn Steingard

©Carolyn Steingard

©Cheryl Wallach

©Cheryl Wallach

©Chris Baird

©Chris Baird

©Chris Baird

©Chris Baird

©Chris Bone

©Chris Bone

©Chris Greenwood

©Chris Greenwood

©Chris Greenwood

©Chris Greenwood

©Chris Hayward

©Chris Hayward

©Christian Van Schepen

©Christian Van Schepen

©Connie Quinton

©Connie Quinton

©Connie Quinton

©Connie Quinton

©Dave Benson

©Dave Benson

©Dave Williamson

©Dave Williamson

©Dave Williamson

©Dave Williamson

©Dave Williamson

©Dave Williamson

©Dominic Byrne

©Dominic Byrne

©Dominic Byrne

©Donna Caplinger

©Donna Caplinger

©Drake Dyck

©Drake Dyck

©Drake Dyck

©Drake Dyck

©Edwina Podemski

©Edwina Podemski

©Elaine Delichte O'Keefe

©Elaine Delichte O’Keefe

©Fran Gallogly

©Fran Gallogly

©Fran Gallogly

©Fran Gallogly

©Frank Schortinghus

©Frank Schortinghus

©George Clayton

©George Clayton

©George Clayton

©George Clayton

©Gerry Ambury

©Gerry Ambury

©Gord Campbell

©Gord Campbell

©Hank Broomfield

©Hank Broomfield

©Heather Donauer

©Heather Donauer

©Huw Jenkins

©Huw Jenkins

©Jane Chesebrough

©Jane Chesebrough

©Janelle Evans

©Janelle Evans

©Janice Kretzer-Prysunka

©Janice Kretzer-Prysunka

©Janet Barclay

©Janet Barclay

©John Foehl

©John Foehl

©Kat Enns

©Kat Enns

©Kathy Stinson

©Kathy Stinson

©Keith Walker

©Keith Walker

©Kelly Kitsch

©Kelly Kitsch

©Kristin Duff

©Kristin Duff

©Liz Forrester

©Liz Forrester

©Liz Forrester

©Liz Forrester

©Lorraine McNeely

©Lorraine McNeely

©Lynn Smith

©Lynn Smith

©Lynn Smith

©Lynn Smith

©Pam Jenks

©Pam Jenks

©Philip Cote

©Philip Cote

©Priya Biswas Miller

©Priya Biswas Miller

©Ralph Croning

©Ralph Croning

©Riana Vermaak

©Riana Vermaak

©Ryan Crouse

©Ryan Crouse

©Shaun Conarroe

©Shaun Conarroe

©Steve Poole

©Steve Poole

©Sue Olmstead

©Susan Olmstead

©Susan Ashley

©Susan Ashley

©Tom Nevesely

©Tom Nevesely

©Tracy Hindle

©Tracy Hindle

14 December

Love is Blind

It’s funny how our expectations and biases colour how we see the world. Sam and I spend much of our time teaching photographers to shed their visual biases and see the world as it is instead of how they think it should be. By being open you’ll get inspiration anywhere and not be shut down by the tunnel vision of expectation.

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As much as I know the lesson of being open in photography, I recently discovered that I am much less keen to shed biases in life. In August of 2014 we lost our beloved dog Brando to cancer. It took us a long time to heal from the loss and even consider the idea of a new furry friend.

NMP.tif

For the last 14 months I have been working part-time at the Cochrane and Area Humane Society and literally hundreds of adoptable dogs have crossed my path. We get dogs of all sizes and breeds and personality types but I found the ones that I were attracted to all had similar qualities. First of all, the dogs that caught my attention were almost always working or sporting dog breeds or mixes. This is not a surprise because the last five dogs that I have owned or co-owned have been a Shepard/Rottie cross (Brando), a Malamute, a Chesapeake Bay Retriever, a Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever and an Australian Shepard cross. I like responsive, active dogs that are happy to please.

Imacon Color Scanner

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And so, possible candidates for adoption were categorized as acceptable or not acceptable by me simply based on looks and general disposition. In short, I was not open to seeing the dogs for who they were but instead for what I wanted them to be. I think I’m not alone…many people I know and work with have a ‘soft spot’ for a certain type or breed of dog. Of course, I thought I was being ‘open’ because I never picked the same breed twice but of course I was biased… unless it was a working/sporting dog it was simply not a candidate. For example, I was really interested in adopting the cattle dog cross below.

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And then… something happens you don’t expect. On November 7, a 2-month old puppy came into the shelter with sarcoptic mange. The poor little fellow was under high quarantine procedures for most of the time until the mange could be cured and he was not contagious. Caring for the little fart allowed me to get to know him, in spite of the severe restrictions placed on him for minimal contact. I never imagined him as a candidate for adoption (he was not my ‘type’). He was just a fun guy that I helped take care of while he got better. And he was cute….

The shelter's intake photo

The shelter’s intake photo of the mange puppy.

It was not until he was out of quarantine and Sam met the little dude that the wheels started to turn. I suggested we take him for an overnight visit and, except for a bit of bossy pants barking, I began to realize that he was a pretty awesome little man. I began to see him for who he was as he wormed his way into my heart. Of course, Sam saw him for himself right away and did not foist expectations on who he should be (she is good that way). Sam was open to adopting the littler bugger. And so, the latest member of the oopoomoo team is a pug/beagle cross (a Puggle) that we have dubbed Charles Affables Puggles the Third or “Affie” to his friends (which is everyone).

Thanks Affie (and Sam) for reminding me that our biases can get in the way of us truly seeing, whether that be in photography or in judging others.

nmp17588

6 November

The oopoomoo Pokie Awards!

Anyone who has been to oopoomoo seminars or workshops will be familiar with one of the most common compositional flaws in photography – the dreaded pokie.

What is a pokie? No, it’s not a friend of Gumby but rather it’s:

Little objects that stick into the edge of your frame accidentally.

Pokies are not purposeful parts of the composition. Instead they sneak into the frame like unwelcome guests and ruin the party by drawing attention to themselves. In short, they weaken your images. In the image below, can you spot the pokie?

©Samantha Chrysanthou

©Samantha Chrysanthou

Pretty obvious, eh? That little spruce branch in the upper right corner of the frame just screams out, “Look at me!”

Sometimes we are so fixated on our subjects while shooting that we don’t notice pokies until later when we look at the images on the computer screen. But once you are aware of pokies you’ll start to notice them all the time and you’ll learn to adjust your composition right away to get rid of those pesky buggers.

©Darwin Wiggett - The little bush in the lower left corner of the frame is a sneaky little pokie.

©Darwin Wiggett – The little bush in the lower left corner of the frame is sneaking into the composition!

©Darwin Wiggett - A Slight shift in position gives a pokie free composition!

©Darwin Wiggett – A slight shift in position kills that annoying pokie! Much better.

In some cases you can clone or crop out the offending pokies but sometimes you can’t. Rather than fix compositional errors in post, you’ll be a better photographer and you’ll save time at the computer later if you learn to spot and eliminate pokies in the field.

©Darwin Wiggett - A definite pokie problem here!

©Darwin Wiggett – A definite pokie problem here!

©Darwin Wiggett - A definite pokie problem here.

©Darwin Wiggett – Ah, pokie free and happy!

The Contest

Show us your best pokie shot and win a spot in one of our January 2017 Resolve: Discover Your Creative Self eCourses. Post your image or images to our oopoomoo Facebook group or email us your entry (info at oopoomoo.com) before midnight MDT November 16, 2017. Below are some ideas of the kinds of images to enter.

  • The Annoying Pokie – Show us a great shot that you made that was ruined or marred by an uninvited pokie.
  • The Pokie Eliminator – Show us how you zapped away a pokie by changing your composition while shooting (we’ll need to see a before picture showing the nasty pokie, and then the fixed, pokie-free photo). No Photoshop fixes please!
  • A Famous Pokie – Show us an annoying pokie in an iconic photograph from a famous photographer (yes, pokies have learned how to be published!). Be sure to credit the photographer and provide a website link to where you found the photo (comment and criticism on published pieces are allowed as fair use). Note: we can only award the pokie prize to a photographer who submits their original work so this last category is more for fun, education and discussion than for prize consideration.

Be sure to tag your images with #thepokieawards to ensure we consider your entry.

©Darwin Wiggett - A popular and widely published image with several pokie problems!

©Darwin Wiggett – A popular and widely published image of mine with several pokie problems!

3 March

The Power of Play for Creative Expression

©Darwin Wiggett - oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett – oopoomoo.com

Many photographers have an agenda when they go out to photograph. Whether it’s to capture a portrait, a destination or a representation of a specific subject we often have a preconceived result in mind before we even press the shutter. We know exactly what we hope to capture and what we want the final result to look like. This is not necessarily good or bad; many of history’s best images came as a result of the photographer seeing the photo in their mind’s eye before the camera was ever lifted to the eye. When I look at my own favourite images, a significant portion were visualized in advance and my job was to make that visualization a reality on film or the digital sensor. But just as many of my favourite photos came about from serendipitous discovery and the most creative and refreshing of those discoveries came when I was just goofing around and playing with the camera, when I was experimenting with no serious intent in mind. I think many of us would benefit from not taking photography too seriously and just going out open-minded and ready to have fun. My best results at photographic play have happened when I leave the ‘serious’ gear behind and just respond with a point-n-shoot or small dSLR. I also abandon all the ‘should do’ photographic rules and techniques and just respond organically. It’s so freeing. Many times I just get junk photos, but just as often a gem emerges. I have no expectations either way but simply go out in the world in joyful play. Let me give a couple of examples.

©Samantha Chrysanthou - oopoomoo.com

©Samantha Chrysanthou – oopoomoo.com

Sam and I used to lead photographic workshops and tours in the Canadian Rockies based out of the Kootenay Plains and Abraham Lake. In the early years most photographers were just happy to be in this amazing locale and make photos of all the things that inspired them. Later on, images of the methane bubbles on Abraham Lake started to circulate on the internet and all of a sudden making images of the bubbles was on the bucket list of most photographers. Our job then became one of leading photographers to the bubbles in sunrise and sunset light so that they could achieve their preconceived result. Amazing images resulted but frankly they all looked pretty much the same. There was a sudden loss of desire to explore the area for all the other visual delights there.  Instead there was a fixation on getting bubble images. I also kept repeating the successful bubble formula images because it helped sell workshops.

©Darwin Wiggett - The image that started the bubble craze.

©Darwin Wiggett – The award-winning image that started the bubble craze.

One day in between winter workshops I went out for a mid-afternoon walk with just a camera and a zoom lens slung over my shoulder. I remember walking the shoreline of Abraham Lake just chilling. I was beach-combing, picking up stones, pieces of ice and pine cones just like a kid. I spent some time balancing myself on one leg on big stones and then rock-hopping stone to stone. In short, I was in goofing-off mode. I was not even remotely thinking about making pictures. In fact, I wanted to escape ‘having to make photos’. I saw some fins of ice along the shoreline and wondered if I could squeeze my way under them. I managed to get under the plate-like slabs of ice and just lay there looking up fascinated with the texture of the ice. Every slight move of my head revealed a new kaleidoscope of wavy distortions. It was mesmerizing. I must have spent twenty minutes just jostling my head around before it dawned on me that I had a camera. A couple of snapshots later and I had some of my favourite images I ever made of Abraham Lake ice. The power of play revealed its creative power.

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett - oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett

Here is another example of the power of play. I am a huge fan of dogs and so as a photographer it was not a big stretch for me to end up photographing ‘man’s best friend’. Anyone who has photographed dogs knows it can be tough unless you have an obedience-trained dog that will take your directed commands. Most dogs are not well trained which says more about the owners than the dogs, but that’s another story. I had some early success with my own dogs that had basic obedience training and, when people saw the images, some of them asked me to photograph their dogs. My expectations of how a dog photo session should go, well orchestrated with trained dogs, went out the window fast. I was frustrated, the dog was stressed and the owner was not happy with the results. The whole thing was not fun. The solution to the problem came when I dropped expectations, and just started playing with the dogs. Forget the damn camera! I worked fun back into my time with the dogs. And then I tried something unorthodox. I put the camera on program mode, turned on the auto-focus and the motor drive and just pointed the camera in the general direction of the dog while we played together. Most of the results were terrible but occasionally magic happened! In the film days this was an expensive experiment, but once digital came along, the fun was cheap and I could play even more. Samantha and I refined this ‘play with the dogs’ photographic approach into a more predictably successful technique which we discuss in our dog photography eBook, Sit, Stay & Smile. In the end it was play and the loss of expectations that resulted in fresh imagery of the dogs.

©Samantha Chrysanthou

©Samantha Chrysanthou

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

©Samantha Chrysanthou - The making of the previous image.

©Samantha Chrysanthou – The making of the previous image.

©Darwin Wiggett - oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett – oopoomoo.com

So… the moral is not to take yourself and your photography too seriously. Make room for play and go out and act like a kid. If you want more exercises in play and in creative discovery be sure to check out our Learning to See Workbook and free Born Creative eBook.

©Darwin Wiggett - oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett

Darwin jumps in a puddle

©Samantha Chrysanthou

3 February

Shadow and Light Photography Assignment Results

Each month in our oopoomoo newsletter we announce an assignment theme; for January it was shadow and light (#shadowandlight). Below are our selected favorites from the images submitted to our Facebook group or by email. The February theme will be announced shortly so be sure to sign up for our newsletter to get a head start!

©AJ Drakie

©AJ Drakie

©Anil Sud

©Anil Sud

©Anil Sud

©Anil Sud

©Anil Sud

©Anil Sud

©April Henrikson Daly

©April Henrikson Daly

©Bill Warmington

©Bill Warmington

©Bob Melynk

©Bob Melynk

©Brian Hayward

©Brian Hayward

©Catherine Byram

©Catherine Byram

©Connie Quinton

©Connie Quinton

©Dennis Webster

©Dennis Webster

©Fred Denner

©Fred Denner

©Gail Reichert

©Gail Reichert

©Hank Broomfield

©Hank Broomfield

©Heather Donauer

©Heather Donauer

©Laurie Bare

©Laurie Bare

©Pam Jenks

©Pam Jenks

©Pam Jenks

©Pam Jenks

©Thomas L Gibson

©Thomas L Gibson

©Tom Nevesely

©Tom Nevesely

31 December

#myoopoomoobest2015 – The top 15 images by oopoomoo creatives

Samantha and I have curated what we think are the top 15 images submitted by our awesome Newsletter subscribers. To be considered, subscribers tagged their image with #myoopoomoobest2015 as a request to be considered in this blog post. Some sent their image by email and some posted to the oopoomoo Creatives Facebook group. We encouraged people to submit one image that represented their best work based on the following criteria:

  • represent who they are photographically as an artist or demonstrate something they learned this year
  • be as well-composed as they can do at their learning level, and
  • be taken ethically.

We kept these guidelines in mind when choosing the photos for display here on the blog. It was a tough choice with over 100 images to choose from but the ones below best represented fresh seeing, original creative vision and good story-telling. So many images ‘almost’ made the cut and Sam and I wrestled and argued and debated the final 15. So, bruised and beaten, we present our choices. Enjoy and happy 2016!

Al Dixon

©Al Dixon

©Al Dixon

Andrew Barron

©Andrew Barron

©Andrew Barron

Bill McQuarrie

©Bill McQuarrie

©Bill McQuarrie

Chris F Payant

©Chris F Payant

©Chris F Payant

Gerry Hiebert

©Gerry Hiebert

©Gerry Hiebert

Henrik Fessler

©Henrik Fessler

©Henrik Fessler

Kat Enns

©Kat Enns

©Kat Enns

Liz Forrester

©Liz Forrester

©Liz Forrester

Nathalie Kulin Greenwood

©Nathalie Kulin Greenwood

©Nathalie Kulin Greenwood

Riana Vermaak

©Riana Vermaak

©Riana Vermaak

Roy Mclaughlin

©Roy Mclaughlin

©Roy Mclaughlin

Ryan Crouse

©Ryan Crouse

©Ryan Crouse

Sherry Christensen

©Sherry Christensen

©Sherry Christensen

Vartkes Peltekoglu

©Vartkes Peltekoglu

©Vartkes Peltekoglu

Vicki Brown

©Vicki Brown

©Vicki Brown

22 December

Best of 2015 – oopoomoo best from Samantha Chrysanthou

As part of our regular monthly Newsletter, this December we asked our subscribers to share with us their best picture of 2015. But the photo could not be just any predictable best, it had to be their ‘oopoomoo best’. To be an ‘oopoomoo best’ the image had to follow these criteria:

  • represent who they are photographically as an artist or demonstrate something they learned this year
  • be as well-composed as they can do at their learning level, and
  • be taken ethically.

If you want to see all the amazing results so far log into your Facebook account and do a search for #myoopoomoobest2015

In the spirit of year-end sharing Sam and I will be showcasing our oopoomoo best image here on the blog but with a twist. Instead of picking our own image to share we are going to chose what we think is our partner’s best image of 2015! Scary stuff to have someone else curate your work.

And so here is my pick of Sam’s best image of 2015. Drum roll please!

©Samantha Chrysanthou

©Samantha Chrysanthou

I chose this image for several reasons. First, it perfectly represents Sam’s creative vision. Sam loves grass and trees and she has both in spades in this picture. Second, Sam creates compositions that are personal and intimate and that drill down to the essence of what attracted her to the scene. We were out shooting in the Rockies and I was photographing a distant lone spruce in a sea of yellow aspens with my 300mm lens (an obvious and easy subject). Sam asked if she could borrow my camera and lens for a minute. She swung the camera away from the obvious fall colours, away from the big peaks in the background and over to a grassy slope just above the road. I could not for the life of me figure out what she was making a picture of! Of course now I see… a quintessential Sam photo, but at the time I thought she had gone mad photographing away from all the big beauty surrounding us. I’m always impressed by how Sam can make ‘something from nothing’ and how she always photographs true to her vision no matter what others are doing around her. So the biggest reason I picked this image is because Sam continues to surprise and delight me with her creative vision. No one can make Sam images, they are unique to her. And so, for me, this image represents Samantha’s answer to the #myoopoomoobest2015 December Newsletter challenge.

2 December

Working the Scene to Find Your Voice

Photographer at Rampart Ponds - Banff National APrk - Alberta

©Darwin Wiggett – oopoomoo.com

The great thing about photography (or any visual art) is that no two photographers see the world in exactly the same way; give ten photographers the same scene to photograph and you’ll most often get ten (or more) different results. Even a single photographer will produce multiple interpretations of the same scene. Often our subconscious notices the scene; there is something there that we like. If we respond with our cameras right away then often we capture that flash of subconscious interest and come away with a photo that honours what we feel about a subject. But just as often, our conscious brain kicks in and overrides our subconscious to make judgments, and to categorize and analyze what we see. The more we think, the further we get from what attracted us in the first place. However, we can often get back to our original ‘attraction’ if we let go of our noisy thoughts and begin to explore the subject more from the heart than the mind. Let’s look at both of these scenarios in turn.

©Darwin Wiggett - Do you just respond or do you think your way through a composition?

©Darwin Wiggett – Do you just respond or do you think your way through a composition?

Sometimes, your heart’s eye gets it right first thing and further explorations take you further from your visual truth. For example, this past October I went on an outing to the Cochrane Ranchehouse, a lovely natural area park near our home. There, while walking around, I found a curved aspen tree in full colour. I immediately stopped where I was, dug out my camera and because the tree was far away, I put on my 300mm lens and made this photo. In hindsight this image perfectly captures what attracted me to the tree in the first place. I like the bent shape and the contrast of bright yellow against a darker subdued backdrop.

©Darwin Wiggett - oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett – oopoomoo.com

But then, of course, my brain kicked in. Stupid brain! What if I got closer and used a shorter lens? What if I tried different angles on the tree and different framing and aspect ratios? All of these ‘what ifs’ were intruding on the purity of my expression.

And so I worked the scene further to answer these conscious questions. All of these mental explorations took me further from what attracted me to the tree in the first place. Sure, the resulting photos (below) are still pleasing but none honoured my heart’s view of the tree like the initial image. I have learned that if I make a photo as soon as something stops me that often that image is the most ‘true’ to my original attraction.

©Darwin Wiggett - oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett – oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett - oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett – oopoomoo.com

Cochrane Ranchehouse scenic, Cochrane, Alberta, Canada ©Darwin Wiggett - oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett – oopoomoo.com

Cochrane Ranchehouse scenic, Cochrane, Alberta, Canada ©Darwin Wiggett - oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett – oopoomoo.com

In the next example, I was driving in the country near Cochrane when I noticed a big snow drift over a grass seed head. I stopped the car, got dressed up and got out the camera gear. In the time it took me to prepare for the cold photography experience, I lost the germ of what attracted me to this scene. The first picture I made was more a document of the overall scene.

©Darwin Wiggett - oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett – oopoomoo.com

I felt the image above was interesting but then I had leading lines of the snow drift and the fence that went nowhere so I zoomed out to take in more of the scene and to have the lines lead to a vanishing point.

©Darwin Wiggett - oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett – oopoomoo.com

Now the lines of the snowdrift and the fence all converge in the distance to take us visually to the part of the fence with the horizontal cross bar. I immediately realized that the fence was not the reason that I stopped the car so I should not include it in the photo.

In the next picture, below,  I concentrated only on the snow and the grass. I thought of the tenuous existence of the grass seed head under the big snow drift and I made the next image to tell that dramatic story.

©Darwin Wiggett - oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett – oopoomoo.com

I like the image above a lot and it tells a story of tension but it’s not why I stopped the car. I finally realized that what grabbed me was pure graphic appeal of the lines of the grass and drift. My mind saw lines and that’s what it wanted to show in the final photograph.

©Darwin Wiggett - oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett – oopoomoo.com

This image above is closer to the reason I initially stopped but as anyone who follows oopoomoo composition teachings will know, there are two areas where the line of the snowdrift is ruined from underlying ‘mergers’. A simple shift to a higher viewpoint and slight change in aspect ratio (slightly more panoramic) eliminated the merger problems and gave me the result I had intended from the beginning.

©Darwin Wiggett - oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett – oopoomoo.com

This final image, above, honours what I initially saw in my flash of subconscious. I just needed to work the scene to get back to my original vision. I blame it all on the cold.

The value of working a scene can either confirm that you had your voice in the first place or that you needed to rediscover your voice. The creative process is exactly that, a process. Don’t be afraid to work it! Let us know what your creative process is and if you get what’s in your mind’s eye right away or if you have to work hard to get a result that is in line with your creative vision.

©Darwin Wiggett - Sam working a scene to get to her creative vision.

©Darwin Wiggett – Sam working a scene to get to her creative vision. Actually she is looking back at me asking if the coffee is still warm in the thermos!

10 November

Honouring Your Creative Vision

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

Samantha and I have written extensively on the oopoomoo blog about honouring your creative vision. To be an artist you need to follow your muse especially when outside forces always seem to want to sabotage your progress. For example, my output in photography was directed for years by the need to produce saleable images for stock photography. I shot things I normally would not be interested in and I learned how to make images which would please photo buyers. Once stock photography started to dry up (post 9-11), then money was to be made in providing tours and workshops to other photographers. The imagery I created was meant to entice participants to sign up for desirable destinations or to learn technique driven processes. My own development as an artist suffered. And so the time has come to allow my creative vision free reign of expression.

©Samantha Chrysanthou

©Samantha Chrysanthou

Samantha and I have taken the pressure off ourselves to produce work for others. We are not shooting for stock nor are we shooting to gather potential tour or workshop clients. Sam never really pursued these things anyway. Instead, we’re returning to photography purely as a creative outlet. Of course, giving up our successful and acclaimed workshop program means we have cut our income by about 1/3rd. But that is a small price to pay to go on a path of self-discovery. To finance our journey we have cut expenses and gotten part time jobs outside the world of photography. Our jobs are what we do to support ourselves as artists. We have decided to purposefully walk the pathway of creativity and see where it takes us. For too long we have been teaching others to do this but we haven’t done it ourselves. You’ll see oopoomoo stay true to its roots of create, inspire and educate through us sharing both our journey and, increasingly, the journeys of others – in fact, we make this adjustment in order to focus more clearly on this important aspect of photo sharing and story-telling. We have a great desire to help photographers be artists. And we welcome all creatives to share their discoveries and stories here on the oopomoo blog or in our oopoomoo Facebook group. Stay tuned!

To read part II of this post, Carving Out Time for Creativity, please go to this link.

©Samantha Chrysanthou

©Samantha Chrysanthou

©Darwin Wiggett

©Darwin Wiggett

14 September

The Importance of Shooting for Yourself in this Internet World of Photography

Here at oopoomoo we have always emphasized creative vision in photography. As a photographer you should honour your interests and express those interests from your heart. In short, we try to teach photographers to be artists. Unfortunately, social media and the internet don’t reward the slow path to self discovery but instead it rewards instant gratification, easy to digest imagery and techniques of the day with photographers scurrying all over the globe to get to iconic destinations to make replica images or replicate techniques of other photographers. There is little reward for nurturing your own creative vision. We have written about his extensively before here and here.

Artists stand out with their individual expression - ©Darwin Wiggett - oopoomoo.com

Artists stand out with their individual expression –
©Darwin Wiggett – oopoomoo.com

Recently, our friend and oopoomoo photography assistant, Catherine returned from taking a workshop with esteemed photographers Freeman Patterson and Andre Gallant. Catherine has long been interested in things that most other photographers pass by. She came with me once on a Canadian Rockies ‘Glory of Autumn’ photography tour and spent her time taking pictures of rocks and sticks while everyone else was making images of mountains and lakes. The other photographers just could not figure out why she was ‘wasting her time’ shooting things she could photograph at home when she was in the Canadian Rockies! The truth was simple – Catherine was following her creative muse, sticks and stone moved her more than big mountain scenes (read about Catherine’s experience at this link). She honoured herself by not caving to peer pressure and shooting for herself. Fast forward to her workshop with Freeman and Andre. Catherine was given an assignment to make reflection shots… in cars. She took to the assignment with gusto and came away with an impressive body of work, so impressive that Freeman singled her out from the class as an example of creative vision. By following her heart, and her interests Catherine emerged as an artist.

Even if no one else 'gets' your work, you still have to do it, you never know what will emerge! - ©Darwin Wiggett - oopoomoo.com

Even if no one else ‘gets’ your work, you still have to do it; you never know what will emerge! – ©Darwin Wiggett – oopoomoo.com

Last October Samantha and I came up with a workshop idea in the Canadian Rockies called “Beyond the Icon”. The idea was to strip away the temptation for photographers to make or expect classic Canadian Rockies iconic photos. We went after the fall colours were over but before winter ice and snow set in. It was the season of browns and for many photographers the Rockies looked blah (if that is possible). We also purposely took our participants to unknown locations and even just stopped roadside randomly and gave out photo assignments. The results from the participants were impressive and it was fulfilling to see growth in the participants’ creative vision. Sam and I also had the opportunity to do these same assignments along with the students. And we got to spend some time before and after the workshop making personal images. After the trip I noticed that my creative vision was evolving from big vertical landscapes in theatrical light to more intimate, abstract and graphic images. Recently, I finished processing the images from this outing (finally!) and thought I would share my 25 personal faves from the trip in this post.

What is your creative vision? Have you seen it evolve over time? Are you able to be true to yourself in spite of external pressures to shoot something different from what you love to shoot? We would love hear about it in the comments on this blog or share some images with us on the oopoomoo Facebook Group.

©Darwin Wiggett - oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett – oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett - oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett – oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett - oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett – oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett - oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett – oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett - oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett – oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett - oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett – oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett - oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett – oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett - oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett – oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett - oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett – oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett - oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett – oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett - oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett – oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett - oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett – oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett - oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett – oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett - oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett – oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett - oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett – oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett - oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett – oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett - oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett – oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett - oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett – oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett - oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett – oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett - oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett – oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett - oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett – oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett - oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett – oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett - oopoomoo.com

©Darwin Wiggett – oopoomoo.com

 

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