7 January

Best of the 2017 Daily Themes – #subtlesunday

For the last few months of 2017 we challenged our oopoomoo Creatives Facebook group with submitting works to a daily theme. For Sunday the theme was #subtlesunday. Below are some of our favourites from the Sunday submissions. Congratulations to all for inspiring work!

Be sure to click on each image to see them larger for full effect. And if you want to participate in our daily challenges be sure to sign up for our oopoomoo newsletter and get our Born Creative eBook for free!

©Antonio Aleo

©Avi Cohen

©Avi Cohen

©Carol James

©Chris Bone

©Chris Greenwood

©Diane E Weiler

©Diane E Weiler

©Elfie Hall

©Gail Burstyn

©Guy Kerr

©Janice Kretzer-Prysunka

©Janice Kretzer-Prysunka

©Jeremy Calow

©Katherine Keates

©Katherine Keates

©Keith Walker

©Keith Walker

©Lawrence Sauter

©Lawrence Sauter

©Lloyd Dykstra

©Pam Jenks

©Pam Jenks

©Pam Jenks

©Royce Howland

©Sheila Wiwchar

©Simon Barker

©Ton Nevesely

6 January

Best of the 2017 Daily Themes – #selectivefocussaturday

For the last few months of 2017 we challenged our oopoomoo Creatives Facebook group with submitting works to a daily theme. For Saturday the theme was #selectivefocussaturday. Below are some of our favourites from the Saturday submissions. Congratulations to all for inspiring work!

Be sure to click on each image to see them larger for full effect. And if you want to participate in our daily challenges be sure to sign up for our oopoomoo newsletter and get our Born Creative eBook for free!

©Avi Cohen

©Brian Hayward

©Darlene Willment

©Diane E Weiler

©Gerry Hiebert

©Janice Kretzer-Prysunka

©Katherine Keates

©Keith Walker

©Lloyd Dykstra

©Mrinal Das

©Pam Jenks

©Riana Vermaak

©Riana Vermaak

©Shaun Conarroe

©Tom Nevesely

©Veronica Reist

5 January

Best of the 2017 Daily Themes – #fineartfriday

For the last few months of 2017 we challenged our oopoomoo Creatives Facebook group with submitting works to a daily theme. For Friday the theme was #fineartfriday. Below are some of our favourites from the Friday submissions. Congratulations to all for inspiring work!

Be sure to click on each image to see them larger for full effect. And if you want to participate in our daily challenges be sure to sign up for our oopoomoo newsletter and get our Born Creative eBook for free!

©Avi Cohen

©Chris Manderson

©Diane E Weiler

©Diane E Weiler

©Dominic Byrne

©Don Wotton

©Janice Kretzer-Prysunka

©Jean Paul Gaboury

©Katherine Keates

©Katherine Keates

©Keith Walker

©Keith Walker

©Keith Walker

©Kristin Duff

©Kristin Duff

©Lloyd Dykstra

©Quincey Deters

©Quincey Deters

©Ralph A Croning

©Robert Skoye

©Royce Howland

©Sean AJ Simmons

©Sheila Wiwchar

©Simon Barker

©Sue Olmstead

©Thomas Gibson

©Vicki Brown

©Wendy Stevenson

©Wendy Stevenson

4 January

Best of the 2017 Daily Themes – #threesonthursday

For the last few months of 2017 we challenged our oopoomoo Creatives Facebook group with submitting works to a daily theme. For Thursday the theme was #threesonthursday. Below are some of our favourites from the Thursday submissions. Congratulations to all for inspiring work!

Be sure to click on each image to see them larger for full effect. And if you want to participate in our daily challenges be sure to sign up for our oopoomoo newsletter and get our Born Creative eBook for free!

©Avi Cohen

©Avi Cohen

©Carol James

©Chris Baird

©Chris Bone

©Chris Bone

©Christian Van Schepen

©Christian Van Schepen

©Claude Hamel

©Darlene Perkin

©Diane E Weiler

©Drake Dyck

©Gail Burstyn

©Gary Galger

©Jeremy Calow

©Katherine Keates

©Keith Walker

©Keith Walker

©Kristin Duff

©Kristin Duff

©Lawrence Sauter

©Len Langevin

©Lloyd Dykstra

©Lloyd Dykstra

©Mike Kapiczowski

©Pam Jenks

©Pam Jenks

©Quincey Deters

©Sheila Wiwchar

©Sue Olmstead

©Tom Nevesely

©Tom Nevesely

©Wendy Stevenson

©Wendy Stevenson

3 January

Best of the 2017 Daily Themes – #weedywednesday

For the last few months of 2017 we challenged our oopoomoo Creatives Facebook group with submitting works to a daily theme. For Wednesday the theme was #weedywednesday. Below are some of our favourites from the Wednesday submissions. Congratulations to all for inspiring work!

Be sure to click on each image to see them larger for full effect. And if you want to participate in our daily challenges be sure to sign up for our oopoomoo newsletter and get our Born Creative eBook for free!

©Avi Cohen

©Carol Iles

©Chris Baird

©Chris Bone

©Diane E Weiler

©Diane E Weiler

©Diane E Weiler

©Gail Burstyn

©Gail Burstyn

©Gail Burstyn

©Janice Kretzer-Prysunka

©Katherine Keates

©Katherine Keates

©Katherine Keates

©Kristin Duff

©Lawrence Sauter

©Lloyd Dykstra

©Lloyd Dykstra

©Michael John Perkins

©Pam Jenks

©Phyllis Fitzsimons

©Quincey Deters

©Quincey Deters

©Sheila Wiwchar

©Simon Barker

©Simon Barker

©Simon Barker

©Tom Gibson

©Trever Miller

2 January

Best of the 2017 Daily Themes – #terrifictreestuesday

For the last few months of 2017 we challenged our oopoomoo Creatives Facebook group with submitting works to a daily theme. For Tuesday the theme was #terrifictreestuesday. Below are some of our favourites from the Tuesday submissions – this was one of our most popular themes!

Congratulations to all for inspiring work. Be sure to click on each image to see them larger for full effect. And if you want to participate in our daily challenges be sure to sign up for our oopoomoo newsletter and get our Born Creative eBook for free.

©Ann Nickerson

©April Henrikson Daly

©Bernice MacDonald

©Chris Baird

©Chris Bone

©Darlene Perkin

©Derek Chambers

©Don Wotton

©Doug Blunt

©Gail Burstyn

©Gail Burstyn

©Gerry Hiebert

©Katherine Keates

©Keith Walker

©Lloyd Dykstra

©Mike Kapiczowski

©Pam Jenks

©Phyllis Fitzsimons

©Sean A. J. Simmons

©Sheila Wiwchar

©Tom Nevesely

©Wayne Simpson

1 January

Best of the 2017 Daily Themes – #morningbluesmonday

For the last few months of 2017 we challenged our oopoomoo Creatives Facebook group with submitting works to a daily theme. For Monday the theme was #morningbluesmonday. Below are some of our favourites from the Monday submissions. Congratulations to all for inspiring work!

Be sure to click on each image to see them larger for full effect. And if you want to participate in our daily challenges be sure to sign up for our oopoomoo newsletter and get our Born Creative eBook for free!

©Avi Cohen

©Christophe Potworowski

©Diane E Weiler

©Janice Kretzer-Prysunka

©Keith Walker

©Keith Walker

©Linda Mellstrom

©Mike Kapiczowski

©Royce Howland

©Royce Howland

©Tom Nevesely

©Wayne Simpson

29 November

Getting Published and the Power of Print

We’re excited to see more and more photographers are considering printing their work or are still keen on submitting to print publications. As a business with educational offerings in both digital and tangible worlds, we appreciate both; online and in-person experiences each have their strengths. But as recent publishers of League magazine, our boutique print showcase of artful (and ethically captured) photography, we have a soft spot for the way print can bring images to life.

©Samantha Chrysanthou

Perhaps this is because a fine print – or fine printing – has its own way of interacting with light. Choice of paper, process and inks all combine in this magical alchemy to interact with ambient light to create a thing that almost seems to have a presence… view a piece of actual art on a wall and compare that experience to flipping through a catalogue of reproductions and you will know what I mean. With photography, a print is that art on the wall. Print is the photographer’s expression made real in a controlled, deliberately physical sense. That careful selection of materials, like paper and ink, influence the outcome in a way no digital monitor can.

Not all magazines geek out on paper and ink like we do with League. This is understandable since the cost of materials has an impact on subscription price. Yet variety is the spice of life, which is probably why limited edition publishing of niche magazines is enjoying a little resurgence right now.

Regardless of what magazine you submit to, there are some common steps in the process that can help you advance your work before the editors. Based on our experience publishing the first issue of League, we’ve created a free mini guide, How to Be Published, for those photographers seeking to have their work showcased in print. This little booklet (digital, by the way) is helpful for submissions to any magazine. We hope to see your submissions, either to League, or in some of our other favourite print magazines, down the road.

20 October

Grounded by Jodi Sware – A Creative Vision of Prairie Skies

©Jodi Sware

In our latest oopoomoo newsletter, we introduced the theme of grounded (#grounded) – “showcase an expansive sky anchored by a narrow sliver of land”. Jodi Sware immediately sent in a portfolio of images that we just had to share here! Here is what she said about why she includes expansive skies in her work:

I love including our gorgeous, big Alberta sky in my photographs. It was actually a turning point in my photography a few years ago when I realized how much I loved including that big sky in my images. When I started shooting this style I noticed customers and followers commenting on the sky in many images and I believe it is part of my style now. My clients are still the focal point, but I think when framed by a beautiful sky, the images are elevated to art, not just a photo. Clients seem much more willing to order large wall images when our incredible skies are more prominent in the photo.

Enjoy Jodi’s portfolio and be sure to submit your own #grounded image to the oopoomoo Creatives Facebook group or email us your entry for consideration here on the blog.

©Jodi Sware

@Jodi Sware

@Jodi Sware

@Jodi Sware

@Jodi Sware

@Jodi Sware

@Jodi Sware

@Jodi Sware

@Jodi Sware

 

26 September

Would You Photograph if You Couldn’t Share?

The following article appeared in summer/fall 2016 issue (#38) of Outdoor Photography Canada (OPC) magazine. Subscribe to get this great magazine delivered to your mailbox. The latest issue (#43) is one of the best yet!

©Darwin Wiggett

I recently found myself pondering a rather strange question…would I still photograph if I could never share the resulting images with another soul? This thought got me thinking about why people photograph in the first place. Most of us do share our memories, stories, travels, and life events with others. Without an audience to view our pictures what’s the point of making photos? Indeed, among art circles there is the contention that for art to exist there has to be a ‘connection’. You can’t have connection without an audience. By this logic art can only exist if there is someone beyond the artist to view it.

©Darwin Wiggett

The point here is not to debate whether art needs an audience to be art but rather to get to the fundamental question of why we photograph, or why we create in the first place. Beyond recording memories and experiences, I suspect we photograph for many different reasons just like people write or paint or compose music for many different reasons. And, as with other art forms, I think we photograph because of internal and external motivations at heart.

©Darwin Wiggett

Henry Darger was a custodian by day and a painter and writer by night. He spent most of his adult life creating fantastical paintings and writings in his spare time, and no one around him knew anything about his creative life. It was not until after his death when his landlord came to clean out his room that his art was discovered. Henry did not create his pieces with an audience in mind; he kept his art to himself and made his art for his own pleasure or more likely for his own therapy to work through his difficult childhood as an institutionalized orphan. Darger’s motivations and reasons for creating art were internal.

I wonder if there are few Darger’s out there in today’s era of social sharing. I can think of plenty of artists, probably the majority, who produce work for external reasons. They feel they have something to share with the outside world whether that’s simply to share the joy and beauty of nature as they see it or to make social statements about the world around them. They make art showcasing how they see the world but knowing at the time of creation that they will present their work to the world.

©Darwin Wiggett

There are dangers to both approaches. For those who do it purely for internal reasons there is a danger that what you create will be too personal for anyone else to understand should it ever be seen. On the other hand, because the work was not created for an outside audience it will be pure of intent. When producing work to share with others the results are often more accessible but there is the likely possibility that the responses of your audience will inform the content of your art. I see this latter point a lot in photography where social media responses to a photographer’s work colour what and how they photograph. Personal work that does not get a lot of ‘likes’ is abandoned for a style of photo that generates many positive responses. There is the real danger of creating homogenous and predictable or fashionable and trendy work.

©Darwin Wiggett

In the end, I think we all need to look at why we photograph and what camp of artists we generally fall into. Are you a navel gazer or a social sharer? Once you know your true motivations you can then try and avoid the pitfalls that lie in wait with either approach. In my own photography I started out making images purely for my own purposes without expectation or need to share. Later on my photography became all about sharing what I saw with others. It soon began to feel like I was creating for an audience and not for me. I am now returning full circle to creating for internal reasons and I feel a new spark of inspiration. Will I ever share this new work? It’s hard to say but for now I am creating a new body of work just for me and it feels great. So would I photograph if I couldn’t share the results with anyone else? The answer for me is a resounding yes! What about you?

©Samantha Chrysanthou

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